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  • A man reportedly called Edmonds, Washington, day cares with graphic threats on Monday, and police are trying to find him. The man threatened violence, saying children would be shot, police said. But the threats were so graphic that investigators wouldn’t give specifics.  Five day cares in Edmonds received threatening calls Monday, and they were put on lockdown while multiple agencies responded.  >> Read more news stories As of Monday night, none of the threats were carried out. While Edmonds police said they did not want to scare anyone, they believe the threat still exists and that parents need to be particularly cautious. Investigators said the suspect could be anywhere in the world, but appears to have ties to Edmonds. They are actively still trying to find out who this man is – and Edmonds police said they’d never dealt with an incident like this before. – Visit KIRO7.com for updates on this developing story.
  • Parkland Speaks: Survivors from Marjory Stoneman Douglas Share Their Stories' needed to be written, its authors believe, but wish desperately it hadn't. The book by 43 students and teachers who lived through February's high school massacre gives a poignant, raw, and sometimes horrifically graphic look into the six-minute shooting spree where 17 died and its aftermath as a well-off Fort Lauderdale suburb suddenly found itself mourning in a global spotlight that has dimmed but will never reach black. 'I lost my sense of innocence. I lost my sense of security. I lost my ability to see the world as I had only hours earlier. I would give anything to go back,' wrote journalism teacher Sarah Lerner, who edited the 192-page paperback of essays, poems, photos and art published Tuesday by Crown Books. Lerner and three student contributors gathered recently in a park a mile from the school to talk about the tragedy and how the book helped them cope as a veneer of normalcy returns weeks before the anniversary. Nearby, a few dozen special education students practiced yoga, helped by Stoneman Douglas volunteers. A skater zipped past. Elementary kids noisily played soccer. THE POET 'How many did he kill? After hours of no sleep, my eyes slip shut, as I still weep, there is a feeling in my gut, I wake up screaming, the memories haunt my head' - Brianna Jesionowski in her poem, 'First Night.' Jesionowski's English class was ending when shots rang out just outside on the first floor of the three-story freshman building. The gunman fired down the hallway with an AR-15 semi-automatic rifle and through windows into classrooms, but not hers. He then climbed the stairs, killing as he went. But Jesionowski and her classmates didn't know it was real. There had been rumors that the school would hold an active-shooter drill with blank guns and drama students portraying victims. 'We thought it was weird - we had never been through anything like this,' she said. Even after police evacuated her class and she exited through a blood-filled hallway, she said her mind wouldn't accept the reality until she met her older sister, Kaitlyn, whose hands were bloody from comforting a girl as she died. She began writing poems before she asked to contribute to the book - it's how she copes. Several are featured. 'I had so many different feelings. I was confused. My sister gave me good advice to write it down and sort through it,' she said. THE LETTER WRITER 'My name is Leni Steinhardt and I am a survivor of a school shooting. That is a sentence no sixteen-year-old should have to write' - Leni Steinhardt in her essay, 'Dear Senator Marco Rubio.' The letter, which Steinhardt also sent Congress members, details the terror she felt as she called her parents to say she loved them in case she never got another chance. How her brother lost a friend. It asks a pointed question: 'What are you and the rest of the government doing to prevent this from happening again?' 'It was important that he heard it from me because I was angered after the shooting,' Steinhardt said. 'I really didn't have anyone to go to after this. My parents never lived through a shooting. My grandparents didn't know. There really wasn't anyone in my life who could answer these questions.' She said Rubio responded, agreeing changes are needed but gave no specifics. THE PHOTOGRAPHER The photo shows three girls hugging tight in a Stoneman Douglas walkway, their eyes closed. Are they frightened? Mourning? No. Brianna Fisher took the photo long before the shooting on a first day of school of friends happy to see each other. She posted it on Instagram shortly after the shooting to show what school should be, not what it had become. For her, the book represents what her schoolmates experienced - and she and the other contributors have a major responsibility. 'Not every student is going to be speaking to the press or writing something - it needs to be an accurate presentation,' Fisher said. THE TEACHER For Lerner, like everyone, it had been a normal day. In her classroom across from the freshman building, she'd quizzed students on George Orwell's book '1984,' dropping chocolate kisses on their desks so they wouldn't think her a 'total monster' for interrupting their Valentine's Day. She posted a selfie of the red leggings she wore for the occasion. During the shooting, she and some students huddled until SWAT officers found them and led them away. She said the book has helped her and the students heal. 'We went through this together and we are going to get through this together,' she said.
  • Authorities investigating four recent Nevada killings say murder charges are pending against a man suspected of being in the U.S. illegally. Wilbur Martinez-Guzman, 20, was arrested Saturday in Carson City and is being held on possession of stolen property, burglary and immigration charges. Authorities say they expect to file murder charges against him in the coming days in the shooting deaths of an elderly Reno couple and two women who lived near the town of Gardnerville. Carson City Sheriff Ken Furlong said at a Sunday news conference that federal immigration authorities told his office Martinez-Guzman had lived in Carson City for about a year and was in the country illegally. Furlong said Monday he didn't know where Martinez-Guzman is originally from, and a message left with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement was not immediately returned. President Donald Trump mentioned the killings Monday in a tweet calling for his long-promised border wall. Authorities say Connie Koontz, 56, was found dead Jan. 10 in her home in Gardnerville Ranchos, about 15 miles (24 kilometers) south of Carson City. Three days later, 74-year-old Sophia Renken was found dead in her home about a mile from where Koontz lived. On Wednesday, the bodies of 81-year-old Gerald David, and his 80-year-old wife, Sharon, were found in their home on the southern edge of Reno, about 20 miles (32 kilometers) north of Carson City. Furlong said the investigation is ongoing and it's too soon to comment on a possible motive. He said Martinez-Guzman didn't yet have an attorney who could comment on his behalf. ___ This story has been corrected to show Martinez-Guzman is 20 years old, not 19.
  • Starbucks is expanding its delivery service and aims to offer it at nearly one-fourth of its U.S. company-operated coffee shops. The company said it is launching the service Tuesday in San Francisco and will expand to some stores in New York, Boston, Washington, Chicago and Los Angeles in coming weeks. It tested the idea in 200 Miami stores last fall. Starbucks says 95 percent of its core menu will be available for order using the Uber Eats mobile app. There will be a $2.49 booking fee. In December, company executives laid out plans to expand deliveries in the U.S. and China this year. Executives say delivery works best in dense urban areas where Uber Eats' delivery fees are lower because of high demand, and customers spend more than they do in stores.
  • When gunmakers and dealers gather this week in Las Vegas for the industry's largest annual conference, they will be grappling with slumping sales and a shift in politics that many didn't envision two years ago when gun-friendly Donald Trump and a GOP-controlled Congress took office. Some of the top priorities for the industry — expanding the reach of concealed carry permits and easing restrictions on so-called 'silencers' — remain in limbo, and prospects for expanding gun rights are nil for the foreseeable future. Instead, fueled by the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, the federal government banned bump stocks and newly in-charge U.S. House Democrats introduced legislation that would require background checks for virtually every firearm sale, regardless of whether it's from a gun dealer or a private sale. Even without Democrats' gains in November's midterm elections, the industry was facing a so-called 'Trump slump,' a plummet in sales that happens amid gun rights-friendly administrations. Background checks were at an all-time high in 2016, President Barack Obama's last full year in office, numbering more than 27.5 million; since then, background checks have been at about 25 million each year. Gary Ramey, owner of Georgian gunmaker Honor Defense, says the mood at last year's SHOT Show, which stands for Shooting, Hunting and Outdoor Trade, was subdued. He's expecting the same this year. 'There was no one to beat up. You didn't have President Obama to put up in PowerPoint and say 'He's the best gun salesman, look what he's doing to our country,'' he said. 'Numbers are down,' he added. 'You can't deny it.' Robert J. Spitzer, chairman of political science at the State University of New York at Cortland and a longtime watcher of gun issues, said that not only have shifting politics made it difficult for the gun industry to gain ground but high-profile mass shootings — like the Las Vegas shooting that happened just miles from where the SHOT Show will be held and the Parkland, Florida, high school shooting — also cast a pall. 'After the Parkland shooting, (gun rights' initiatives) were kind of frozen in their tracks,' Spitzer said. 'Now there's no chance that it's going anywhere.' It's easier to drive up gun sales when there's the threat or risk of gun-rights being restricted, he said. 'It's harder to rally people when your target is one house of Congress. It just doesn't have the same galvanizing effect.' The National Shooting Sports Foundation's SHOT Show has been held annually for more than four decades. This year more than 60,000 will attend the event that runs Tuesday through Friday — from gun dealers and manufacturers to companies that cater to law enforcement. There's a wait list for exhibitors that is several hundred names long and it will have some 13 miles of aisles featuring products from more than 1,700 companies. Last year's show in Las Vegas was held just months after a gunman killed 58 people and injured hundreds at an outdoor music festival. The massacre was carried out by a gunman armed with bump stocks, which allow the long guns to mimic fully automatic weapons. Organizers last year restricted media access to trade journalists. This year's show will again allow reporters from mainstream media to attend. Gun-control advocates are rejoicing in the gun industry's misfortunes of late and chalking it up to not just shifting attitudes among Americans but a shift in elected political leaders. 'Without a fake menace in the White House to gin up fears, gun sales have been in a Trump slump and, as a result, the NRA is on the rocks,' said John Feinblatt, president of Everytown for Gun Safety, a group founded by former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg. Joe Bartozzi, the new president of the National Shooting Sports Foundation, said the industry isn't disturbed by the drop in gun sales or the shift in federal politics. While Democrats who ran on gun-control platforms made huge gains in the House, he sees the Senate shifting to the other end of the spectrum. 'Having been in the industry for over 30 years and seeing the trends of gun sales ebb and flow over time, it's very hard to put your finger on any one specific issue as to why this happens. It's just the cyclical nature of the business,' he said. Trump's campaign was bolstered by about $30 million from the National Rifle Association and when he took office, the industry had hoped that a host of gun rights would be enacted. The Trump administration quickly nixed an Obama-imposed rule that made it more difficult for some disabled people to purchase and possess firearms. But other industry priorities, such as reciprocity between states for carrying certain concealed firearms and a measure that would ease restrictions on purchasing suppressors that help muffle the sound when a gun is fired, failed to gain traction. For now, Bartozzi said his organization is focused on a measure that would expand public gun ranges, funded by an existing tax on firearms and ammunition sales that supports conservation, safety programs and shooting ranges on public lands. The hope is that increasing the number of public ranges will encourage more people to become hunters.
  • Democratic presidential contender Julian Castro launched his campaign by pledging support for 'Medicare for All,' free universal preschool, a large public investment in renewable energy and two years of free college for all Americans. That wasn't enough for some of his party's most liberal members. Critics on social media quickly knocked Castro's plan to provide only two years of free higher education — instead of four — as 'half measures,' ''scraps' and 'corporate Dem doublespeak.' Aware of the backlash, the former Obama administration Cabinet member clarified his position in an interview days later. 'At least the first two years of college or university or apprenticeship program should be tuition free — and preferably four years,' Castro told The Associated Press. 'We're going to work toward that.' Welcome to the 2020 presidential primary. Almost no policy is too liberal for Democrats fighting to win over their party's base, which is demanding a presidential nominee dedicated to pursuing bold action on America's most pressing challenges. Among two dozen possible candidates, virtually all have embraced universal health care in one form or another. Some have rallied behind free college, job guarantee programs, a $15 minimum wage and abolishing — or at least reconstituting — the federal agency that enforces immigration laws. While few have outlined detailed proposals to fund their priorities, most would generate new revenue by taxing the rich. The leftward lurch on top policies carries risks. President Donald Trump and his Republican allies are betting that voters will ultimately reject the Democratic proposals as extreme. Some GOP leaders cast lesser plans as socialism during the Obama era. Republican critics are joined by a handful of moderate Democrats, who fear that promises by well-intentioned presidential prospects may create unrealistic expectations with their party's most passionate voters. Billionaire businessman Michael Bloomberg, a former Republican mayor of New York now considering a Democratic presidential bid, recently opined that primary voters might be receptive to a more moderate approach. 'Most Democrats want a middle-of-the-road strategy,' Bloomberg said on ABC's 'The View.' He added: 'If you go off on trying to push for something that has no chance of getting done, that we couldn't possibly pay for, that just takes away from where you can really make progress in helping people that need help today.' So far, at least, very few presidential prospects are heeding such warnings. In the 2016 campaign, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, a self-described democratic socialist, was the only presidential contender to support 'Medicare for All,' a proposal that would essentially provide free health care coverage to all Americans. This year, it's hard to find anyone in opposition. That's even after one recent study predicted the plan would cost taxpayers more than $32 trillion. Proponents argue that those same taxpayers would save the trillions they currently spend out-of-pocket for their health care. Lesser-known policies have emerged heading into 2020 as well. New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, who is expected to launch his presidential campaign soon, has sponsored legislation to create a federal jobs guarantee program in several communities across America. The pilot program, which is co-sponsored by fellow 2020ers like New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, California Sen. Kamala Harris and Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley, could ultimately transform the U.S. labor market by providing well-paid government employment with benefits for anyone who wants it. Critics decry the plan as a step toward socialism. 'Big challenges demand big solutions,' Booker told the AP. 'Both Martin Luther King Jr. and President Franklin Roosevelt believed that every American had the right to a job, and that right has only become more important in this age of increasing income inequality, labor market concentration and continued employment discrimination.' Billionaire activist Tom Steyer supports much of the liberal movement's new priorities — including Trump's impeachment — but says the federal jobs guarantee 'doesn't make sense' given the nation's low employment rate. 'I want the private sector to produce jobs people can live on,' he said in an interview. 'A guarantee of government jobs doesn't make sense.' Yet Steyer insists that most of his party's policy priorities — universal health care and free college, among them — are anything but radical. 'The Republicans are an extremist far-right, radical party. When you say we need to moderate to their position, there's nothing moderate or pragmatic about their position,' said Steyer, who recently backed away from a presidential run, although he's expected to spend tens of millions of dollars to shape the 2020 debate. Free college is quickly emerging as a litmus test for Democratic contenders. Those already on the record backing free tuition at public colleges and universities include former Vice President Joe Biden, Sanders, Gillibrand, Harris and Warren. Estimates vary for the cost to state and local taxpayers, although Sanders acknowledged it could be $70 billion annually. Warren seemed to back away from her support for free college during an appearance in Iowa earlier in the month, however. In 2017, she co-sponsored the 'College For All Act,' which would have made tuition free at public universities. Asked in a radio interview whether she supports reducing the cost of college or offering it free, Warren responded: 'No, I think this is about reducing the cost.' It's unlikely the Democratic Party's energized base would tolerate any significant shifts to the center on free college — or any of the party's top issues. Such populist appeals helped fuel sweeping Democratic victories in last fall's midterm elections, while producing a new generation of unapologetic Democratic leaders such as New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who is aligned with the democratic socialist movement. And polls repeatedly suggest that voters support proposals for universal health care, free college and free preschool. 'We have seen a dramatic shift in the Democratic Party's political center,' said Adam Green, co-founder of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee. 'Those who deny that are hurting their chances in 2020.' Meanwhile, Castro, like others in the early 2020 field, says he's fully committed to a 'bold vision' to address the nation's top policy challenges. 'All Democrats recognize that this is not going to be easy, that to get Medicare for all, for instance, it's not guaranteed, it's not going to be easy, it may require along the way there are some compromises,' he said. 'But I'm convinced that it's worth it to go forward.