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The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Georgia jumps more than 1,000 since last night.

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  • More than 1.3 million people worldwide – including more than 369,000 people in the United States – have been infected with the new coronavirus, and the number of deaths from the outbreak continues to rise. Officials are attempting to contain the COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S. as hospitals brace for unprecedented patient surges. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking cases in the U.S. here. Live updates for Tuesday, April 7, continue below:   UK officials report 786 new fatal coronavirus cases Update 11:45 a.m. EDT April 7: Officials in the United Kingdom recorded 786 new fatal COVID-19 cases on Tuesday, raising the country’s coronavirus death toll to 6,159. Authorities with the British Department of Health and Social Care also announced a total of 55,242 people have been diagnosed with coronavirus infections in the U.K. 875 new coronavirus cases reported in Florida Update 11:35 a.m. EDT April 7: Health officials in Florida said Tuesday that 875 new COVID-19 cases have been identified, raising the total number of cases in the state to 14,504, WJAX-TV reported. Officials said 1,777 of the COVID-19 cases were serious enough to require hospitalization. The Florida Department of Health also reported 29 more fatal cases Tuesday, bringing the state’s total number of deaths to 283. Over 11,000 people have died of COVID-19 in the US Update 11:25 a.m. EDT April 7: More than 11,000 people have died of coronavirus in the United States, according to numbers compiled by Johns Hopkins University. The deaths include 5,489 reported in New York state and 1,005 reported in New Jersey. Officials in Michigan have also reported 727 deaths while 512 fatal cases have been reported in Louisiana. As of Tuesday morning, more than 369,000 Americans have tested positive for COVID-19. Largest single-day increase in fatal coronavirus cases reported in New York Update 11:15 a.m. EDT April 7: Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York said Tuesday that health officials in the state have recorded the highest single-day number of fatal coronavirus cases in the state. Cuomo said Tuesday that 731 new fatal cases were identified in the state, bringing the total number of deaths attributed to the coronavirus in New York to 5,489. In the last four days, the highest single-day number of reported deaths had been 630. Cuomo also said the number of people admitted to hospitals in New York state with COVID-19 complications appears to be stabilizing. As of Tuesday, 138,836 people have tested positive for COVID-19 in the state, which is the hardest hit by the new coronavirus. In New Jersey, the state with the second-most number of cases in the country, 41,090 people have tested positive and 1,005 people have died. U.N. estimates loss of 195M full-time jobs globally Update 11 a.m. EDT April 7: The U.N.’s labor organization estimates the equivalent of 195 million full-time jobs could be lost in the second quarter alone from the COVID-19 outbreak, with businesses and plants shuttered worldwide. The projection from the International Labor Organization is based on an emerging impact of the virus, and it amounts to a big increase from its March 18 prediction for an extra 25 million jobs losses for all of 2020. “These figures speak powerfully for themselves: That the world of work is suffering an absolutely extraordinary fall,' ILO Director-General Guy Ryder said. The agency said full or partial lockdown measures now affect nearly 2.7 billion workers or about 81 percent of the global workforce. Some 1.25 billion are in hard-hit sectors such as hotel and food services, manufacturing and retail. US surgeon general optimistic continued social distancing will slow coronavirus spread Update 10:30 a.m. EDT April 7: U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams said Tuesday that he’s optimistic that continued social distancing efforts will allow for businesses to begin reopening in the coming weeks. “I want the American people to know, there is a light at the end of this tunnel,” Adams said during an appearance on ABC’s “Good Morning America” on Tuesday. “We feel confident that if we keep doing the right thing for the rest of this month that we can start to slowly reopen in some places.” He echoed comments made by other public health officials in recent weeks urging Americans to continue social distancing and to avoid being in public if at all possible. “It’s going to be a hard and a tough week but the American people have the power to change the trajectory of this epidemic if we come together like we have after past tragedies in this country,” Adams said. Treasury secretary says Trump looking at how to reopen parts of US economy Update 10 a.m. EDT April 7: Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Tuesday that President Donald Trump is looking at how to open parts of the U.S. economy that have been shuttered by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. “The president is very much looking at how we can reopen parts of the economy,” Mnuchin said Tuesday in an appearance on Fox Business News. “There are parts of the country, like New York, where obviously this is very, very concerning. There are other parts of the country where it’s not.” The U.S. economy has suffered nearly 10 million layoffs in just the past few weeks — far exceeding the figure for any corresponding period on record. Still, health officials have cautioned governments not to rush to reopen businesses. “The last thing any country needs is to open schools and businesses only to be forced to close them again because of a resurgence,” World Health Organization director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said last month. Mnuchin said Tuesday that he’s heard from health professionals who have indicated that “in many places where we’re quite close to the worst point.' 'They’re beginning to peak and I think then things are going to get better,” he said. US stocks open higher on hopes virus peak could be closer Update 9:50 am. EDT April 7: Stocks climbed in early trading on Wall Street on Tuesday as markets around the world piled on even more big gains following their huge rally a day earlier. The S&P 500 index rose 3% in the first few minutes of trading and added on to Monday’s 7% surge, following encouraging signs that the coronavirus pandemic may be close to leveling off in some of the hardest hit areas of the world. The stock market is looking ahead to when economies will reopen after authorities shut down businesses and travel and issued stay-at-home orders in hopes of slowing the spread of the virus. Queen Elizabeth wishes prime minister a 'full and speedy recovery’ Update 9:45 a.m. EDT April 7: Queen Elizabeth of the United Kingdom shared well wishes for Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his family after he was admitted Monday to intensive care with COVID-19 symptoms. Johnson had been quarantined in his Downing Street residence since being diagnosed March 26 with COVID-19. His fiancee, Carrie Symonds, who is pregnant, is also recovering from coronavirus symptoms. “Earlier today The Queen sent a message to Carrie Symonds and to the Johnson family,” representatives of the British royal family said Tuesday in a statement on Twitter. “Her Majesty said they were in her thoughts and that she wished the Prime Minister a full and speedy recovery.” The queen’s son, 71-year-old Prince Charles, went into self-isolation last month after testing positive for COVID-19, according to BBC News. He has since recovered. US surgeon general: We are going to be at 2 million tests this week Update 9:35 a.m. EDT April 7: U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams said Tuesday that 2 million coronavirus tests will have been administered in the United States by the end of the week. “Testing is a concern,” Adams said during an appearance on “CBS This Morning” on Tuesday. “We are going to be at two million test this week and it’s rapidly ramping up with the commercial industry coming on board.” Adams said he’s been in touch with Assistant Secretary for Health Adm. Brett Giroir, who was tasked last month with coordinating COVID-19 diagnostic testing efforts. “I speak with him every day,” Adams said. “He assures me that by the end of this month, we should be not only doing just diagnostic testing but also having good surveillance testing across the country.' Walgreens to expand drive-thru testing Update 9:20 a.m. EDT April 7: Officials with Walgreens announced Tuesday that the pharmacy chain is working to open 15 new drive-thru testing locations in seven states: Arizona, Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Tennessee and Texas. The testing sites will use Abbott Laboratory’s ID NOW COVID-19 test, which can deliver results in as little as five minutes, according to Walgreens. The company expects to be able to test up to 3,000 people per day at each location. “We’re continuing to do everything we can, both with our own resources and also by partnering with others, to serve as an access point within the community for COVID-19 testing,' company president Richard Ashworth said Tuesday in a statement. 'Opening our first drive-thru testing location last month has allowed us to quickly learn and develop an efficient and scalable process, and we’re pleased to be working with Abbott to help accelerate our efforts, and to enable quick results for those being tested.” The testing sites are expected to open beginning later this week. Navy crewman on hospital ship in New York tests positive for COVID-19 Update 9:05 a.m. EDT April 7: U.S. Navy officials said a crew member on board the hospital ship USNS Comfort in New York harbor tested positive for COVID-19 on Monday. The crew member has been isolated from patients and other crew members, and Navy officials said the illness will not affect the Comfort’s mission of receiving and treating patients. The Navy had recently announced that the Comfort, which initially was taking only non-COVID patients, is now accepting trauma, emergency and urgent care patients regardless of their COVID status. British prime minister receiving oxygen but not on ventilator, spokesman says Update 8:25 a.m. EDT April 7: A spokesman for Prime Minister Boris Johnson of the United Kingdom told reporters Tuesday that he remained in good spirits after being admitted to intensive care Monday with worsening symptoms of COVID-19, Reuters reported. “The prime minister has been stable overnight and remains in good spirits,' the spokesman said, according to Reuters. 'He is receiving standard oxygen treatment and breathing without any other assistance. He has not required mechanical ventilation, or non-invasive respiratory support.” Johnson had been quarantined in his Downing Street residence since being diagnosed with COVID-19 on March 26. Global coronavirus deaths near 76K, worldwide cases approach 1.4 million Updated 7:45 a.m. EDT April 7: The global death toll attributed to the novel coronavirus hit 75,973 early Tuesday, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally. In the four months since the virus was first identified in Wuhan, China, it has infected at least 1,360,039 people worldwide. Five countries – the United States, Spain, Italy, Germany and France – have now confirmed total infection counts well above China’s 82,718 cases. • The United States has reported 368,449 cases, resulting in 10,993 deaths. • Spain has confirmed 140,510 cases, resulting in 13,798 deaths. • Italy has reported 132,547 infections, resulting in 16,523 deaths. • Germany has reported 103,375 cases, resulting in 1,810 deaths. • France has confirmed 98,984 infections, resulting in 8,926 deaths. • China has recorded 82,718 cases, resulting in 3,335 deaths. • Iran has recorded 62,589 cases, resulting in 3,872 deaths. • The United Kingdom has reported 52,301 cases, resulting in 5,385 deaths. • Turkey has recorded 30,217 cases, resulting in 649 deaths. • Belgium has confirmed 22,194 cases, resulting in 2,035 deaths. Nissan furloughs roughly 10K US factory workers Updated 6:35 a.m. EDT April 7: In a move to conserve cash amid, Nissan said it has furloughed about 10,000 U.S. factory workers as the automaker combats a sharp drop in sales fueled by the novel coronavirus pandemic, The Wall Street Journal reported. The cuts, which represent the majority of Nissan’s US workforce, will affect workers at Nissan plants in Tennessee and Mississippi, the Journal reported. Japan officially declares state of emergency amid spiking coronavirus cases Updated 5:14 a.m. EDT April 7: Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe formally declared a one-month state of emergency during a coronavirus task force meeting moments ago. The measure, effective immediately, is slated to last through May 6 across seven virus-stricken prefectures. Per the declaration, public transport and supermarkets will remain open in a bid to maintain “basic economic activity,” but residents are asked to stay home and avoid unnecessary trips. According to a tally maintained by researchers at Johns Hopkins University, Japan has confirmed 3,906 coronavirus cases to date, resulting in at least 92 deaths. Coronavirus takes toll on NYPD with 12 dead, nearly 20 percent unable to work Updated 5:03 a.m. EDT April 7: A 12th member of the New York City Police Department died Sunday of a suspected coronavirus infection, while nearly 20 percent of the department’s uniformed workforce is out sick, CNN reported. NYPD Auxiliary Police Officer Ramon Roman became the department’s 12th virus-related fatality since the pandemic began. According to the department, 6,974 NYPD members were out sick on Monday, accounting for slightly more than 19 percent of its entire uniformed workforce. That figure has increased more than seven percentage points in 10 days, CNN reported. Toyota to make face shields to help combat coronavirus pandemic Updated 4:21 a.m. EDT April 7: Toyota announced plans early Tuesday to produce between 500 and 600 medical face shields per week to help front-line medical workers more effectively battle the novel coronavirus pandemic. “Toyota will do what it can to help efforts on the front lines of treatment and in limiting the further spread of COVID-19, which has become society’s biggest priority,” the company said in a prepared statement. Specifically, the Japanese automaker will use injection molds and 3-D printing to mass produce the protective equipment. The statement also notes Toyota plans to leverage its supply chain to distribute thermometers and other protective gear. Although the company statement focuses primarily on production in its Japanese facilities, multiple U.S. based Toyota manufacturing facilities have announced similar plans. White House trade adviser warned of coronavirus in January, report says Updated 3:07 a.m. EDT April 7: Peter Navarro, U.S. President Donald Trump’s trade adviser, warned administration colleagues in late January that the novel coronavirus could kill more than 500,000 Americans and cost the nation trillions of dollars, The New York Times reported early Tuesday. “The lack of immune protection or an existing cure or vaccine would leave Americans defenseless in the case of a full-blown coronavirus outbreak on U.S. soil,” a Jan. 29 Navarro memo to the National Security Council said, adding, “This lack of protection elevates the risk of the coronavirus evolving into a full-blown pandemic, imperiling the lives of millions of Americans.” Read more here. CDC study: US children less likely than adults to fall seriously ill from coronavirus Updated 2:33 a.m. EDT April 7: Preliminary data appears to support early-stage inklings that children in the United States have fared far better than adults in both coronavirus infection rates and severity of symptoms once diagnosed. According to The Washington Post, the CDC’s first report analyzing the coronavirus’ effects on children determined slightly less than 2% of confirmed U.S. cases have occurred in pediatric patients. The agency’s research also suggests that while some serious virus-induced illnesses have occurred in young patients, those younger than 18 have been typically less likely to require hospitalization and less likely to develop fevers or coughs than older patients. Tyson Foods suspends Iowa production after coronavirus sweeps plant Updated 2:10 a.m. EDT April 7: More than two dozen employees of a Tyson Foods plant in Iowa have tested positive for the coronavirus, prompting the company to idle its Columbus Junction production facility. In a statement released Monday, Chief Executive Officer Noel White called the suspension a cautious step to address “varying levels of production impact. 'In an effort to minimize the impact on our overall production, we’re diverting the livestock supply originally scheduled for delivery to Columbus Junction to some of our other pork plants in the region,” White said. Elsewhere, he said, workers at all locations will now have their temperatures taken before being allowed to enter their respective facilities; deep cleaning protocols have been adopted; and the company is working to acquire protective face coverings for workers. US coronavirus deaths hit 10,986, total cases near 370K Published 12:45 a.m. EDT April 7: The number of novel coronavirus cases in the United States surpassed 368,000 early Tuesday morning across all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands. According to researchers at Johns Hopkins University, there are at least 368,196 confirmed U.S. cases of the virus, which have resulted in at least 10,986 deaths. U.S. cases now more than double the 136,675 reported in Spain and the 132,547 confirmed in Italy. Of the confirmed U.S. deaths, 4,758 – or roughly 43% of the nationwide total – have occurred in New York, 1,003 in New Jersey and 727 in Michigan. In terms of diagnosed cases, New York remains the hardest hit with at least 131,815 confirmed cases – more than three times the next-closest state – followed by New Jersey with 41,090 and Michigan with 17,221. Six other states have now confirmed at least 12,000 novel coronavirus cases each, including: • California: 16,334, including 388 deaths • Louisiana: 14,867, including 512 deaths • Massachusetts: 13,837, including 260 deaths • Florida: 13,629, including 254 deaths • Pennsylvania: 13,206, including 179 deaths • Illinois: 12,262, including 308 deaths Meanwhile, Washington state and Texas each has confirmed at least 8,000 novel coronavirus infections, followed closely by Georgia with 7,558 cases; Connecticut, Colorado, Indiana, Ohio and Maryland each has confirmed at least 4,000 cases; Tennessee and North Carolina each has confirmed at least 3,000 cases; and Virginia, Missouri, Arizona, Wisconsin, South Carolina and Alabama each has confirmed at least 2,000 cases. Click here to see CNN’s state-by-state breakdown. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Myron Rolle had a stellar career as a defensive back at Florida State University but never played a game in the NFL after being drafted by the Tennessee Titans. However, Rolle is still playing defense -- fighting the coronavirus pandemic while serving a neurosurgeon residency at Massachusetts General Hospital. Rolle, 33, a former safety who is in his third year at the Boston hospital, has seen his work area transformed into a floor dedicated exclusively to treating COVID-19 patients, The Tennessean reported. When Massachusetts General set up a surge clinic that triages patients who come off the street with coronavirus symptoms, Rolle, a Rhodes Scholar who graduated from medical school at FSU, volunteered. 'Obviously, neurosurgery is not directly connected to this upper respiratory illness,” Rolle told The Tennessean. “But just like in football, if you’re called to do something different that you weren’t expecting, you adjust. You adapt. They’re showing us a new formation that we didn’t see on tape? You’ve got to hunker down and get the job done. In my opinion, this novel disease is something like that. A formation, a personnel package that we haven’t seen before. We have to meet the challenge, and I’m happy to be able to join the fight.” Before pursuing a career in the NFL, Rolle was the top-rated high school football prospect in New Jersey. At FSU, Rolle earned ACC Rookie of the Year and freshman All-American honors, according to CBS Sports. After winning his appointment as a Rhodes Scholar, Rolle skipped his senior season with the Seminoles and earned a degree in medical anthropology at Oxford. Rolle was selected by the Titans in the sixth round of the 2010 NFL draft and spent three years in the NFL -- two seasons in Tennessee and one in Pittsburgh --- before deciding to pursue his medical career, USA Today reported. It’s not the first time Rolle has put himself on the front lines of a dangerous situation. When Hurricane Dorian devastated the Bahamas, Rolle, whose family hails from the islands, volunteered to go help. “They were like, ‘Well, are you sure? It’s dangerous down there. Supplies aren’t great. There’s disease in the water,' ' Rolle told The Tennessean. “I said, ‘None of that bothers me. I have to go down. I have to leave my residency and take care of my home country.'” Rolle spent more than two weeks in the Bahamas, providing medical assistance as part of Massachusetts General’s disaster team. “Didn’t look back,” Rolle told the newspaper. “Just went straight in, head down, just like an athlete, into the fight.” Rolle has the same mentality about tackling the issues surrounding the coronavirus. He said the medical concerns are legitimate. “The hype is real, and it’s not done for hysteria,” Rolle told The Tennesseean. “It’s not done to scare or to frighten anyone. It’s really done to make you aware that there are stories and cases here that will change lives, and would shock people, to the point where if this is your loved one, you’d say, Yeah, I want everyone to take this as serious as I’m taking it, because I’m seeing firsthand what’s happening. And the ideology that we have an important role to play. Social distance, physical distance, lifestyle modifications, staying home, doing everything you can to kind of flatten this curve — all of that is crucial.”
  • Despite the influx of patients who have COVID-19 and potentially not having enough medical personnel or supplies, some hospital workers are getting notices that they will be furloughed, multiple media outlets are reporting. The reason: Hospitals have had to cancel elective and nonemergency services as they either treat coronavirus patients or prepare for the pandemic. It’s all because while hospitals provide health care, they do it based on a business model and revenues are falling drastically, The New York Times reported. At the same time, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said hospitals in his city may not have enough medical workers to treat everyone, the Times reported de Blasio said last week. Trinity Health’s Mid-Atlantic System has five hospitals in Pennsylvania is planning to furlough some staff. The same goes for Shore Medical Center and Bayada Home Health Care, both based in New Jersey, are temporarily letting go some workers -- like those in nonclinical fields or administrative and managerial positions -- who are not caring for patients, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported. Not only have nonemergency procedures stopped, so has charitable giving, another source of income for hospitals, the Inquirer reported. At Lakes Region General Hospital in Laconia, New Hampshire, more than 600 employees are being furloughed, the New Hampshire Union Leader reported. The hospital has seen a more than 50% loss in revenue since the pandemic started. Not only is the hospital furloughing workers because of a decrease in revenue, they are also looking at it to help cut back on the amount of personal protective gear needed, the Union Leader reported. The hospital is also closing down doctors’ offices and keep “minimal medical staff to support essential COVID-19 activities,' the president and CEO of LRGHealthcare, Kevin Donovan, told the Union Leader. Gov. Chris Sununu created a $50 million emergency fund for hospitals last month. He said LRGHealthcare received $5.25 million no-interest, six-month loan from the fund, the Union Leader reported. But not all hospitals are looking to cut staff. Some are looking to hire and they’re asking those who have retired or have left to come back and help save lives. The Veterans Health Administration is looking for people to work on virtual care, to man the national call center or provide direct patient care or support at a VA medical center. The VHA is compiling a database from which to recruit. Click here for more information.
  • Three Florida deputies have been placed on a 14-day quarantine after performing life-saving efforts on a man who later tested positive for the coronavirus, authorities said. According to a news release from the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office,, deputies were called to a home in Thonotosassa, located east of Tampa, Sunday at 8:30 p.m. and found a man unconscious. The three deputies who arrived performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation on the man and used an automated external defibrillator, the Sheriff’s Office said. According to the release, doctors gave the man a dose of naloxone after a relative told them he had taken heroin that night. The man was taken to an area hospital and treated for an expected overdose. Results from the hospital originally revealed the man had been suffering from pneumonia. Doctors also tested him for COVID-19, and the results came back positive, the Sheriff’s Office said. Because the deputies had been in contact with the man, they were placed on a two-week quarantine and will be monitored for symptoms. “We are dealing with an unprecedented and unpredictable threat, but as law enforcement officers, we will always run towards danger to save lives,' Hillsborough County Sheriff Chad Chronister said in a statement. 'We don’t take our responsibilities lightly, and we are working to fulfill our duties amid the coronavirus in the safest way possible. “This is an instance where three brave deputies jumped into action, putting their own safety second to the life of another. However, all of our deputies have been equipped with the tools they need for protection, including masks and gloves.” No deputies have tested positive for the virus, the Sheriff’s Office said.
  • Big stars are getting together to do their part to battle the COVID-19 pandemic. The World Health Organization and Global Citizen announced Monday the “One World: Together at Home” concert. It will air Saturday, April 18, on ABC, NBC and CBS, as well as international networks and other media companies, and will be streamed on Amazon Prime Video, Apple, Facebook and Instagram. It will be hosted by Jimmy Fallon, Jimmy Kimmel and Stephen Colbert. The show will air at 8 p.m. EDT, 5 p.m. PDT. Artists and stars scheduled to appear to include: Lady Gaga Alanis Morrissette Andrea Bocelli Billie Eilish Billie Joe Armstrong Burna Boy Chris Martin David Beckham Eddie Vedder Elton John FINNEAS Idris and Sabrina Elba J Balvin John Legend Kacey Musgraves Keith Urban Kerry Washington Lang Lang Lizzo Maluma Paul McCartney Priyanka Chopra Jonas Shah Rukh Khan Stevie Wonder Some of the Sesame Street characters will also appear to help gain support for the worldwide COVID-19 response, WHO said. It will help raise money for local and regional charities, as well as the COVID-19 Solidarity Response Fund.
  • Times are tough for restaurant servers and bartenders. The coronavirus pandemic has closed or curtailed many of their businesses, and the workers, who rely on tips, are feeling the economic pinch. An Alabama nurse decided to help out, establishing a GoFundMe page for workers in the Huntsville area. Chasen Uptain said he knows many service workers who are struggling, either from being laid off or from reductions in salaries. 'Some of them already live paycheck to paycheck, Uptain told WHNT. 'Now that there are no checks coming in, I know several people who are having trouble paying rent.” The GoFundMe page has a goal of $10,000, and 20 people have already donated more than $1,200. Uptain said he plans to give the money to service workers who are most in need, WHNT reported. He is hoping to provide each worker with at least a few hundred dollars. “I know that almost everyone in this community has eaten at a restaurant down there, after a hard day’s work, (or) had a drink, it’s a good place to unwind,' Uptain told the television station. “If it just takes a little bit of the sting out (for the workers), I’d just like to help if I can.' You can donate by clicking here.