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New Kids On The Block, Salt N Pepa & Naughty by Nature

Thursday

Jul 11, 2019 – 7:30 PM

  • New Kids On The Block
  • Salt N Pepa
  • Naughty By Nature

More Info

New Kids On The Block: With hits like "Hangin' Tough"and "Step by Step," NKOTB were the progenitors of the boy-band phenomenon. Then, they took a fifteen year hiatus to focus on solo projects and start families. However, the New Kids on the Block concert schedule has been announced and the boys are back on the road. This time around, they are teaming up with Backstreet Boys for a whirlwind tour.

The band was discovered by record producer, Maurice Starr, after New Edition ousted him as their manager in the early eighties. Though they were only in their early teens, the boys rehearsed and practiced diligently until they secured a recording contract with Columbia Records in 1985. By 1986, New Kids on the Block released their debut self-titled album, but the album stalled on the charts, failing to produce any radio-friendly singles. New Kids on the Block tour dates were booked at any venue that was willing to host them. Not deterred, the band returned to the studio and shed their manufactured pop sound in favor of an R&B influenced album.

This sophomore effort, "Hangin' Tough," featuring the lead single, "Please Don't Go Girl," catapulted the band to superstar status. While sales for the album were initially slow, the album picked up momentum when New Kids on the Block tour dates were scheduled as the opening act for teen pop-star Tiffany. Overnight, they became tween heartthrobs and the album eventually hit #1 on the Billboard 200-- ultimately certified eight times platinum by the RIAA. Following the immense success of the album, and in an ironic role reversal, the New Kids on the Block concert schedule booked Tiffany as their opening act.

To capitalize on their superstardom, the band went back into the studio after their tour, and recorded the follow-up, Step by Step. The album's title track hit #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and became their biggest single to date. The album was certified three times platinum and New Kids on the Block tour dates were booked throughout 1990-1991. The New Kids on the Block concert schedule during this period had them performing more than 200 shows around the world. New Kids on the Block were no longer just pop-stars; they became a brand, and licensed out their name to backpacks, lunch pails-- they even had a short lived cartoon. In 1991, Forbes ranked them as the highest earning entertainers of the year, beating out Madonna and Michael Jackson.

The band's success began to wane by 1992 and they dropped Maurice Starr as their manager in 1993, self-producing their, Face the Music record. It failed to come even close to matching the success of its multi-platinum predecessors. New Kids on the Block booked tour dates at smaller venues and clubs to support the album before eventually breaking up in 1995. The dream was temporarily over and it wasn't long before the guys began pursuing their own solo efforts. Although it took almost fifteen years, the New Kids on the Block announced a reunion in 2008. They recorded their comeback album, The Block, which debuted at #2 on the Billboard 200 albums chart. New Kids on the Block tour dates were booked internationally in support of the album and featured Lady Gaga and Natasha Bedingfield as supporting acts.

New Kids on the Block have now joined forces with the Backstreet Boys for their co-headlining international tour this spring and summer 2011. Reunions don't last forever, don't miss out on the chance to catch New Kids on the Block this summer in your area. Use Eventful as your source for New Kids on the Block Tour dates and concert schedule updates.

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  • Authorities investigating four recent Nevada killings say murder charges are pending against a man suspected of being in the U.S. illegally. Wilbur Martinez-Guzman, 20, was arrested Saturday in Carson City and is being held on possession of stolen property, burglary and immigration charges. Authorities say they expect to file murder charges against him in the coming days in the shooting deaths of an elderly Reno couple and two women who lived near the town of Gardnerville. Carson City Sheriff Ken Furlong said at a Sunday news conference that federal immigration authorities told his office Martinez-Guzman had lived in Carson City for about a year and was in the country illegally. Furlong said Monday he didn't know where Martinez-Guzman is originally from, and a message left with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement was not immediately returned. President Donald Trump mentioned the killings Monday in a tweet calling for his long-promised border wall. Authorities say Connie Koontz, 56, was found dead Jan. 10 in her home in Gardnerville Ranchos, about 15 miles (24 kilometers) south of Carson City. Three days later, 74-year-old Sophia Renken was found dead in her home about a mile from where Koontz lived. On Wednesday, the bodies of 81-year-old Gerald David, and his 80-year-old wife, Sharon, were found in their home on the southern edge of Reno, about 20 miles (32 kilometers) north of Carson City. Furlong said the investigation is ongoing and it's too soon to comment on a possible motive. He said Martinez-Guzman didn't yet have an attorney who could comment on his behalf. ___ This story has been corrected to show Martinez-Guzman is 20 years old, not 19.
  • When gunmakers and dealers gather this week in Las Vegas for the industry's largest annual conference, they will be grappling with slumping sales and a shift in politics that many didn't envision two years ago when gun-friendly Donald Trump and a GOP-controlled Congress took office. Some of the top priorities for the industry — expanding the reach of concealed carry permits and easing restrictions on so-called 'silencers' — remain in limbo, and prospects for expanding gun rights are nil for the foreseeable future. Instead, fueled by the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, the federal government banned bump stocks and newly in-charge U.S. House Democrats introduced legislation that would require background checks for virtually every firearm sale, regardless of whether it's from a gun dealer or a private sale. Even without Democrats' gains in November's midterm elections, the industry was facing a so-called 'Trump slump,' a plummet in sales that happens amid gun rights-friendly administrations. Background checks were at an all-time high in 2016, President Barack Obama's last full year in office, numbering more than 27.5 million; since then, background checks have been at about 25 million each year. Gary Ramey, owner of Georgian gunmaker Honor Defense, says the mood at last year's SHOT Show, which stands for Shooting, Hunting and Outdoor Trade, was subdued. He's expecting the same this year. 'There was no one to beat up. You didn't have President Obama to put up in PowerPoint and say 'He's the best gun salesman, look what he's doing to our country,'' he said. 'Numbers are down,' he added. 'You can't deny it.' Robert J. Spitzer, chairman of political science at the State University of New York at Cortland and a longtime watcher of gun issues, said that not only have shifting politics made it difficult for the gun industry to gain ground but high-profile mass shootings — like the Las Vegas shooting that happened just miles from where the SHOT Show will be held and the Parkland, Florida, high school shooting — also cast a pall. 'After the Parkland shooting, (gun rights' initiatives) were kind of frozen in their tracks,' Spitzer said. 'Now there's no chance that it's going anywhere.' It's easier to drive up gun sales when there's the threat or risk of gun-rights being restricted, he said. 'It's harder to rally people when your target is one house of Congress. It just doesn't have the same galvanizing effect.' The National Shooting Sports Foundation's SHOT Show has been held annually for more than four decades. This year more than 60,000 will attend the event that runs Tuesday through Friday — from gun dealers and manufacturers to companies that cater to law enforcement. There's a wait list for exhibitors that is several hundred names long and it will have some 13 miles of aisles featuring products from more than 1,700 companies. Last year's show in Las Vegas was held just months after a gunman killed 58 people and injured hundreds at an outdoor music festival. The massacre was carried out by a gunman armed with bump stocks, which allow the long guns to mimic fully automatic weapons. Organizers last year restricted media access to trade journalists. This year's show will again allow reporters from mainstream media to attend. Gun-control advocates are rejoicing in the gun industry's misfortunes of late and chalking it up to not just shifting attitudes among Americans but a shift in elected political leaders. 'Without a fake menace in the White House to gin up fears, gun sales have been in a Trump slump and, as a result, the NRA is on the rocks,' said John Feinblatt, president of Everytown for Gun Safety, a group founded by former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg. Joe Bartozzi, the new president of the National Shooting Sports Foundation, said the industry isn't disturbed by the drop in gun sales or the shift in federal politics. While Democrats who ran on gun-control platforms made huge gains in the House, he sees the Senate shifting to the other end of the spectrum. 'Having been in the industry for over 30 years and seeing the trends of gun sales ebb and flow over time, it's very hard to put your finger on any one specific issue as to why this happens. It's just the cyclical nature of the business,' he said. Trump's campaign was bolstered by about $30 million from the National Rifle Association and when he took office, the industry had hoped that a host of gun rights would be enacted. The Trump administration quickly nixed an Obama-imposed rule that made it more difficult for some disabled people to purchase and possess firearms. But other industry priorities, such as reciprocity between states for carrying certain concealed firearms and a measure that would ease restrictions on purchasing suppressors that help muffle the sound when a gun is fired, failed to gain traction. For now, Bartozzi said his organization is focused on a measure that would expand public gun ranges, funded by an existing tax on firearms and ammunition sales that supports conservation, safety programs and shooting ranges on public lands. The hope is that increasing the number of public ranges will encourage more people to become hunters.
  • Democratic presidential contender Julian Castro launched his campaign by pledging support for 'Medicare for All,' free universal preschool, a large public investment in renewable energy and two years of free college for all Americans. That wasn't enough for some of his party's most liberal members. Critics on social media quickly knocked Castro's plan to provide only two years of free higher education — instead of four — as 'half measures,' ''scraps' and 'corporate Dem doublespeak.' Aware of the backlash, the former Obama administration Cabinet member clarified his position in an interview days later. 'At least the first two years of college or university or apprenticeship program should be tuition free — and preferably four years,' Castro told The Associated Press. 'We're going to work toward that.' Welcome to the 2020 presidential primary. Almost no policy is too liberal for Democrats fighting to win over their party's base, which is demanding a presidential nominee dedicated to pursuing bold action on America's most pressing challenges. Among two dozen possible candidates, virtually all have embraced universal health care in one form or another. Some have rallied behind free college, job guarantee programs, a $15 minimum wage and abolishing — or at least reconstituting — the federal agency that enforces immigration laws. While few have outlined detailed proposals to fund their priorities, most would generate new revenue by taxing the rich. The leftward lurch on top policies carries risks. President Donald Trump and his Republican allies are betting that voters will ultimately reject the Democratic proposals as extreme. Some GOP leaders cast lesser plans as socialism during the Obama era. Republican critics are joined by a handful of moderate Democrats, who fear that promises by well-intentioned presidential prospects may create unrealistic expectations with their party's most passionate voters. Billionaire businessman Michael Bloomberg, a former Republican mayor of New York now considering a Democratic presidential bid, recently opined that primary voters might be receptive to a more moderate approach. 'Most Democrats want a middle-of-the-road strategy,' Bloomberg said on ABC's 'The View.' He added: 'If you go off on trying to push for something that has no chance of getting done, that we couldn't possibly pay for, that just takes away from where you can really make progress in helping people that need help today.' So far, at least, very few presidential prospects are heeding such warnings. In the 2016 campaign, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, a self-described democratic socialist, was the only presidential contender to support 'Medicare for All,' a proposal that would essentially provide free health care coverage to all Americans. This year, it's hard to find anyone in opposition. That's even after one recent study predicted the plan would cost taxpayers more than $32 trillion. Proponents argue that those same taxpayers would save the trillions they currently spend out-of-pocket for their health care. Lesser-known policies have emerged heading into 2020 as well. New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, who is expected to launch his presidential campaign soon, has sponsored legislation to create a federal jobs guarantee program in several communities across America. The pilot program, which is co-sponsored by fellow 2020ers like New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, California Sen. Kamala Harris and Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley, could ultimately transform the U.S. labor market by providing well-paid government employment with benefits for anyone who wants it. Critics decry the plan as a step toward socialism. 'Big challenges demand big solutions,' Booker told the AP. 'Both Martin Luther King Jr. and President Franklin Roosevelt believed that every American had the right to a job, and that right has only become more important in this age of increasing income inequality, labor market concentration and continued employment discrimination.' Billionaire activist Tom Steyer supports much of the liberal movement's new priorities — including Trump's impeachment — but says the federal jobs guarantee 'doesn't make sense' given the nation's low employment rate. 'I want the private sector to produce jobs people can live on,' he said in an interview. 'A guarantee of government jobs doesn't make sense.' Yet Steyer insists that most of his party's policy priorities — universal health care and free college, among them — are anything but radical. 'The Republicans are an extremist far-right, radical party. When you say we need to moderate to their position, there's nothing moderate or pragmatic about their position,' said Steyer, who recently backed away from a presidential run, although he's expected to spend tens of millions of dollars to shape the 2020 debate. Free college is quickly emerging as a litmus test for Democratic contenders. Those already on the record backing free tuition at public colleges and universities include former Vice President Joe Biden, Sanders, Gillibrand, Harris and Warren. Estimates vary for the cost to state and local taxpayers, although Sanders acknowledged it could be $70 billion annually. Warren seemed to back away from her support for free college during an appearance in Iowa earlier in the month, however. In 2017, she co-sponsored the 'College For All Act,' which would have made tuition free at public universities. Asked in a radio interview whether she supports reducing the cost of college or offering it free, Warren responded: 'No, I think this is about reducing the cost.' It's unlikely the Democratic Party's energized base would tolerate any significant shifts to the center on free college — or any of the party's top issues. Such populist appeals helped fuel sweeping Democratic victories in last fall's midterm elections, while producing a new generation of unapologetic Democratic leaders such as New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who is aligned with the democratic socialist movement. And polls repeatedly suggest that voters support proposals for universal health care, free college and free preschool. 'We have seen a dramatic shift in the Democratic Party's political center,' said Adam Green, co-founder of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee. 'Those who deny that are hurting their chances in 2020.' Meanwhile, Castro, like others in the early 2020 field, says he's fully committed to a 'bold vision' to address the nation's top policy challenges. 'All Democrats recognize that this is not going to be easy, that to get Medicare for all, for instance, it's not guaranteed, it's not going to be easy, it may require along the way there are some compromises,' he said. 'But I'm convinced that it's worth it to go forward.
  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is laying out her strategy on health care and first up is improvements to 'Obamacare' and legislation to lower prescription drug costs. 'Medicare for all' will get hearings. Pelosi and President Donald Trump have been sounding similar themes about the need to address the high drug costs. But her plans to broaden financial help for health insurance through the Affordable Care Act are unlikely to find takers among Republicans. Either way, Democrats believe voters gave them a mandate on health care in the midterm elections that returned the House to their control. Pushing her agenda, Pelosi is working from the ground up through major House committees. Her relationships with powerful chairmen and subcommittee chairs stretch back years. She's 'playing chess on three boards at once,' said Jim McDermott, a former Democratic congressman from Washington state, who predicts Pelosi's most difficult challenge will be 'herding new members' impatient for sweeping changes. Responding to written questions from The Associated Press, Pelosi called the ACA 'a pillar of health and financial security,' comparing it to Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security. 'Democrats have the opportunity not only to reverse the years of Republicans' health care sabotage, but to update and improve the Affordable Care Act to further lower families' premiums and out-of-pocket costs, and expand coverage.' Legislation from Energy and Commerce Chairman Frank Pallone, D-N.J., Ways and Means Chairman Richard Neal, D-Mass., and Workforce and Education Chairman Bobby Scott, D-Va., would broaden the number of people who can get financial assistance with their premiums under the Obama health law, and undo the 'family glitch' that prevents some from qualifying for subsidies. It would also restore the HealthCare.gov advertising budget slashed by Trump and block some of his administration's health insurance alternatives. Those issues are separate from legal questions raised by ongoing Republican litigation to overturn the health law. As one if its first acts, the Democratic-led House voted to intervene in the court case to defend the law. The ACA package has little chance as a stand-alone bill. But parts of it could become bargaining chips when Congress considers major budget legislation. The 2010 health law belonged as much to Pelosi as to former President Barack Obama, said McDermott. 'She's taking 'Obamacare' and very carefully figuring out where you have to support it,' he said. 'What you are seeing right now is a very methodical and thoughtful planner.' On prescription drugs, Trump and the Democrats are occupying some of the same rhetorical territory, an unusual circumstance that could bring about unexpected results. Both sides say Americans shouldn't have to keep paying more for medications than consumers in other economically advanced countries where governments regulate prices. The Trump administration has designed an experiment to apply international pricing to Medicare 'Part B' drugs administered in doctors' offices. Pelosi wants to expand price relief to retail pharmacy drugs that seniors purchase through Medicare's 'Part D' prescription drug benefit, a much bigger move. A bill introduced by leading Democrats would authorize Medicare to negotiate directly with drug companies using international prices as a fallback. 'President Trump said he'd 'negotiate like crazy' to bring down Medicare prescription drug prices, and since the midterm election he's spoken about working with Democrats,' Pelosi wrote to AP. 'We have an opportunity to enact the tough legislative negotiating authority needed to actually lower prescription drug prices for consumers.' One of the top Senate Republicans on health care says he's not inclined to do that. Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley of Iowa says having private insurers negotiate with drug companies has worked. 'Part D is the only federal program I've been involved with that has come in under budget,' said Grassley. 'If it's working, don't mess with it.' Nonetheless, former Health and Human Services Secretary Mike Leavitt, a Republican, said Medicare is 'a good example of places where the administration might surprise.' 'Prescription drug pricing is in a category where both the president and the Democrats have made a commitment,' Leavitt added. 'There will be a lot of division, but in the end there is a very good chance they will find a way that they can both claim victory.' But the biggest health care idea among Democrats is 'Medicare for all,' and on that, Pelosi is cautious. To those on the left 'M4A' means a government-run health care system that would cover every American. That would require major tax increases and a big expansion of government. Pelosi has tapped two committees, Budget and Rules, to handle 'Medicare for all.' Health care legislation doesn't usually originate in either of them. The Budget Committee can be a forum to explore ideas, and Chairman John Yarmuth, D-Ky., has asked the Congressional Budget Office for a report on policy and design issues with instituting a single-payer health care system. The Rules Committee is a legislative traffic cop for the House floor, often acting as an arm of the Speaker's Office. Says Pelosi: 'We're going to have hearings.
  • Senate Republicans have released a measure designed around President Donald Trump's proposal for breaking a budget impasse, its centerpiece his demand for $5.7 billion to build a southern border wall all but guaranteeing Democratic opposition and no foreseeable end to a partial government shutdown. As the shutdown dragged through its fifth week, another missed paycheck loomed for hundreds of thousands of workers. Voting in Congress was not expected to unfold until later in the week. Even then it seemed doubtful that the 1,300-page measure, dubbed 'End The Shutdown And Secure The Border Act,' had any chance of passing swiftly. Senate Republicans hold a 53-47 majority but would need Democrats to reach the usual 60-vote threshold for bills to advance. Not a single Democrat publicly expressed support for Trump's proposal since he announced it over the week. Details of the measure released late Monday highlight the trade-off of border wall funding for temporary protection from deportation for some immigrants. The Republican package would re-open the shuttered parts of government and boost some spending. To try to draw more bipartisan support, it adds $12.7 billion in supplemental funding for regions hit by hurricanes, wildfires and other natural disasters. Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer's office reiterated earlier Monday that Democrats are unwilling to negotiate any border security funding until Trump re-opens the government. 'Nothing has changed with the latest Republican offer,' said Schumer spokesman Justin Goodman. 'President Trump and Senate Republicans are still saying: 'Support my plan or the government stays shut.' That isn't a compromise or a negotiation — it's simply more hostage taking.' While the House and Senate are scheduled to be back in session Tuesday, no votes have been scheduled so far on Trump's plan. And senators, who will be given 24-hour notice ahead of voting, have yet to be recalled to Washington. McConnell spokesman David Popp said Monday that the GOP leader 'will move' to vote on consideration of the president's proposal 'this week.' Trump, who on Sunday lashed out at House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, accusing her of acting 'irrationally,' continued to single her out on Twitter. 'If Nancy Pelosi thinks that Walls are 'immoral,' why isn't she requesting that we take down all of the existing Walls between the U.S. and Mexico,' he wrote Monday. 'Let millions of unchecked 'strangers' just flow into the U.S.' House Democrats this week are pushing ahead with voting on their own legislation to re-open the government and add $1 billion for border security —including 75 more immigration judges and infrastructure improvements — but no funding for the wall. Trump later tweeted: 'Democrats are kidding themselves (they don't really believe it!) if they say you can stop Crime, Drugs, Human Trafficking and Caravans without a Wall or Steel Barrier. Stop playing games and give America the Security it deserves. A Humanitarian Crisis!' Meanwhile, the impact of the shutdown — the longest ever — continued to ripple across the nation as it stretched into its 32nd day Tuesday. The Transportation Security Administration said the percentage of its airport screeners missing work hit 10 percent on Sunday — up from 3.1 percent on the comparable Sunday a year ago. The screeners, who have been working without pay, have been citing financial hardship as the reason they can't report to work. Even so, the agency said it screened 1.78 million passengers Sunday with only 6.9 percent having to wait 15 minutes or longer to get through security. The shutdown had also threatened to disrupt plans for an annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day service at Atlanta's Ebenezer Baptist Church, where the civil rights leader was co-pastor with his father from 1960 until his assassination in 1968. The site is run by the National Park Service and had been closed. But a grant from Delta Air Lines is keeping the church and associated sites, including the home where King was born, open through Feb. 3. Trump on Saturday offered to extend temporary protections for young immigrants brought to the country illegally as children and those fleeing disaster zones for three years in exchange for $5.7 billion for his border wall. Democrats said the proposal for a three-year extension didn't go nearly far enough, and that Trump was using as leverage programs that he had targeted. Meanwhile, some on the right, including conservative commentator Ann Coulter, accused Trump of offering 'amnesty.' 'No, Amnesty is not a part of my offer,' Trump tweeted Sunday, in response. He noted that he'd offered temporary protections for the immigrants in question, but added: 'Amnesty will be used only on a much bigger deal, whether on immigration or something else.' That statement led some to suggest that Trump might be open to including a potential pathway to citizenship for the young 'Dreamer' immigrants in a future proposal to end the standoff. Asked in an interview on 'Fox News Sunday' whether Trump's Saturday proposal represented a 'final offer,' Vice President Mike Pence said the White House was willing to negotiate. 'Well, of course,' Pence said. 'The legislative process is a negotiation.' ___ Associated Press writers David Koenig and Alan Fram in Washington contributed to this report.
  • A North Carolina judge is considering a demand to order the victory of the Republican in the country's last undecided congressional race despite an investigation into whether his lead was boosted by illegal vote-collection tactics. A trial judge in the state's capital of Raleigh hears arguments Tuesday in a lawsuit by Republican Mark Harris, who narrowly led Democrat Dan McCready in the 9th District race before the investigation started. Lawyers for McCready and the state elections board want the lawsuit dismissed. They say a completed investigation and planned evidentiary hearing is needed into allegations that mail-in ballots could have been altered or discarded by a Harris subcontractor. Democrats in the U.S. House indicate they'll also to look into the allegations.