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John Mayer

Sunday

Aug 11, 2019 – 7:30 PM

  • John Mayer

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John Mayer: John Mayer is an American musician. Originally from Connecticut, he attended Berklee College of Music before moving to Atlanta, Georgia in 1997, where he refined his skills and gained a following. His first two studio albums, Room for Squares and Heavier Things, did well commercially, achieving multi-platinum status. In 2003, he won a Best Male Pop Vocal Performance Grammy Award for "Your Body Is a Wonderland". Since then, John Mayer tickets have been a hot commodity. For, not only are his songs very popular and relatable, John Mayer's concerts are full of top-notch musicians that know how to use a stage.

Mayer began his career performing mainly acoustic rock, but gradually began a transition towards the blues genre in 2005 by collaborating with renowned blues artists such as B. B. King, Buddy Guy, and Eric Clapton, and by forming the John Mayer Trio. The blues influence can be heard on his album Continuum, released in September 2006 - as well we seen in John Mayer's scheduled performances. At the 49th Annual Grammy Awards in 2007 Mayer won Best Pop Vocal Album for Continuum and Best Male Pop Vocal Performance for "Waiting on the World to Change". Mayer's career pursuits have extended to stand-up comedy, design, and writing; he has written pieces for magazines, most notably for Esquire. He is also involved in philanthropic activities through his "Back to You" fund and his concern over global warming.

Soon after Mayer got his first guitar, a neighbor gave him a Stevie Ray Vaughan cassette, which began intense love of the blues - again, perceptible in John Mayer's concerts. Despite the reservations of his parents, Mayer became consumed with playing the guitar, and after two years of practice, he started playing at blues bars and other venues in the area, while in high school. In addition to performing alone, he was in a band called Villanova Junction with Tim Procaccini, Joe Beleznay, and Rich Wolf.

When Mayer was seventeen, he was stricken with a cardiac arrhythmia that sent him to the hospital for a weekend. Reflecting on the incident, Mayer said, “That was the moment the songwriter in me was born,” and he penned his first lyrics the night he got home. After graduation, he worked for fifteen months at a gas station until he saved up enough money to buy his first proper guitar—a 1996 Stevie Ray Vaughan signature Stratocaster.

His reputation began to build, and a March 2000 John Mayer scheduled appearance at South by Southwest brought him to the attention of "launch" label, Aware Records. After including him in the Aware Festival concerts and having his songs included on Aware compilations, in early 2001, Aware released Mayer’s internet-only album entitled, Room for Squares. During that time, Aware inked a deal with Columbia Records that gave Columbia first pick in signing Aware artists, and so in September of the same year, Columbia remixed and re-released Room for Squares. As part of the major label "debut", the album's artwork was updated, and the track "3x5" was added. The re-release also included reworked studio versions of the first four songs from his indie album, Inside Wants Out. That's when fans were lucky to get John Mayer tickets.

By the end of 2002, Room for Squares had spawned several radio hits, including "No Such Thing," "Your Body Is a Wonderland," and ultimately, "Why Georgia." In 2003, John Mayer performed as well as won a Grammy for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance for "Your Body Is a Wonderland." In his acceptance speech he remarked, "This is very, very fast, and I promise to catch up." He also figuratively referred to himself as being sixteen, a remark that many mistook to mean that he was only sixteen years old at the time.

Heavier Things, Mayer's second album, was released in 2003 to generally favorable reviews. Rolling Stone, Allmusic and Blender all gave positive, although reserved, feedback. PopMatters said that it "doesn't have as many drawbacks as one might assume". The album was commercially successful, and while it did not sell as well as Room for Squares, it peaked at number one on the US Billboard 200 chart. Mayer earned his first number one single with the song "Daughters" as well as a 2005 Grammy for Song of the Year, beating out fellow contenders Alicia Keys and Kanye West. He dedicated the award to his grandmother, Annie Hoffman, who died in May 2004. He also won Best Male Pop Vocal Performance, beating Elvis Costello, Prince, and Seal for the award. In his February 9 2009 interview on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, Mayer said that he thought he shouldn't have won the Grammy for Song of the year because he thought that Alicia Keys' "If I Ain't Got You" was the better song. Because of this, he removed the top half of the Grammy and gave it to Keys, and kept the bottom part for himself. At the 37th Annual Songwriters Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony in 2006, Mayer was honored with the Hal David Starlight Award.

News

  • For more than 40 years, February has been designated Black History Month. The federally recognized, nationwide celebration honors the achievements of African-American figures, and the city of Atlanta is brimming with heritage and culture. >> Read more trending news  Aside from the typical museums and centers throughout the metro area, there are historic markers and various establishments that tell the stories of some of the nation’s most iconic heroes and events. Interested in learning more about the people and places that helped shape American history? Here are a few lesser-known places to visit to soak up some knowledge. The Atlanta University Center In 1929, Spelman College, Morehouse College, Clark Atlanta University and Morris Brown College united as the Atlanta University Center. The consortium of historically black colleges, which now includes Morehouse School of Medicine, has since become a symbol of educational excellence with notable alumni including Julian Bond, James Weldon Johnson, Pearl Cleage and Spike Lee. If you take a stroll through the campuses, you’ll find various signs that briefly detail the rich history of the famous institutions. Atlanta University Center Consortium, 156 Mildred St., Atlanta. 404-523-5148, aucenter.edu. Paschal’s Restaurant Want a quick lesson and a bite to eat? You’ll experience both at Paschal’s. The eatery, founded by brothers James and Robert Paschal, was a common meeting place for key civil rights leaders and strategists including Martin Luther King, Jr. Today, the walls of the soul food spot, now located on Northside Drive, are lined with black and white photos of influential people of the past and present, and the website includes a comprehensive timeline of Paschal’s history. >> Related: How to celebrate Black History Month in Atlanta 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sunday brunch, 5- 9 p.m. Sunday dinner. Paschal’s Restaurants, 180 Northside Dr. SW, Atlanta. 404-525-2023, paschalsatlanta.com. True Colors Theater Company Founded by Tony-winning Broadway director Kenny Leon, the nonprofit theater said its “mission is to celebrate the rich tradition of black storytelling while giving voice to bold artists of all cultures.” Its latest show, “Skeleton Crew,” follows Detroit-based factory workers during the 2008 recession. Feb. 12 - Mar. 10. $20-50. True Colors at Southwest Arts Center, 915 New Hope Road, Atlanta. 404-532-1901, truecolorstheatre.org. Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church More than a century ago in 1911, Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church became the first African-American Catholic Church in Atlanta thanks to founder Ignatius Lissner. A few decades later during the Civil Rights Movement, Lourdes parishioners participated in protest activities alongside the Old Fourth Ward community. The church, located in what is now the Martin Luther King Jr. Landmark district, still operates today and welcomes people of all races. >>Related: 11 Netflix titles to binge during Black History Month Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church, 25 Boulevard NE, Atlanta. 404-522-6776, lourdesatlanta.org. South-View Cemetery The land for this cemetery was purchased back in 1866 by nine former slaves who grew tired of the mistreatment received at segregated graveyards. The establishment, which sometimes offers walking tours, consists of more than 100 acres and over 70,000 people are buried there, including prominent musicians, athletes and activists. Both Martin Luther King Jr. and Benjamin Mays were laid to rest at South-View before being moved to the Martin Luther King Center and Morehouse College, respectively. South-View Cemetery, 1990 Jonesboro Road SE, Atlanta. 404-622-5393, southviewcemetery.com. Piedmont Park There are a few markers and statues throughout Piedmont Park. During a walk or a bike ride through the area, you’ll find signs about the Cotton States Exposition of 1895 and the famous speech Booker T. Washington delivered during the event. You can even take a guided tour to hear all about the historic occasion. 6 a.m. - 11 p.m. Piedmont Park, 400 Park Dr. NE, Atlanta. 404-875-7275, piedmontpark.org. Smith Plantation Head to Roswell to explore the Smith Plantation. The home, built by slaves in 1845, was preserved by three generations of the Smith family. It’s now a museum, where visitors can take a peek at the two-story farmhouse, which includes servants quarters, a barn, a smokehouse and a cookhouse. >> Related: Black History Month bucket list: 6 must-see Atlanta landmarks 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Sunday. $8 for adults, $7 for 65 and up, $6 for children 6 to 12. Smith Plantation, 935 Alpharetta St., Roswell. 770-641-3978, roswellgov.com.
  • A truck tilted, tipped and sank into an ice-covered lake Saturday afternoon.  >> Read more trending news  It was the first time the driver had been to Lake Winnebago and he drove over Christmas trees that were placed on the icy road to divert traffic from a crack, the Oshkosh Northwestern reported.  “He just drove in a bad spot, that’s all,” Don Herman, owner of Sunk? Dive and Ice Service, told the Northwestern.  It was the 13th vehicle Herman has removed from the lake this year.  The driver was able to escape from the truck before it sank and was not injured.
  • An Atlanta jewelry store was burglarized while the owner and his wife were tied up in their Cobb County home, police said. Two armed, masked gunmen followed the owner of Icebox Diamonds & Watches home on Friday, forced him and his wife inside and took the keys to the jewelry store, Cobb County police said in a statement. After the victims were tied up, one of the robbers took the keys and broke into the store on Peachtree Road in Buckhead, burglarizing it, the statement said. Jewelry and cash were also taken from the owner’s home. He and his wife were not injured. Atlanta police are investigating the Icebox burglary, and Cobb police are handling the home invasion. Anyone with information about the armed robbery is urged to contact police at 770-499-3495 or cobbpolicecrimetips@cobbcounty.org. Channel 2 Action News reported that hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of jewelry was stolen from Icebox, which is known for its celebrity clientele. In other news:
  • Police are on the scene at a Walmart parking lot in Douglas County after a person was shot and killed. Douglasville police confirmed to Channel 2 Action News the shooting happened around 12:50 p.m. outside the Walmart on Thornton Road.  A Channel 2 Action News photographer arrived at the scene to find multiple police officers and cars investigating. It is unknown at this time what led to the shooting. Return for updates.  
  • A group of Philadelphia real estate investors avoided more than a money pit when one of their properties included a booby-trapped staircase. >> Read more trending news  Ekrem Usayler was walking through a Southwest Philadelphia home Jan. 2 with his team when they noticed a small trip-wire covered in glass shards atop a stairway, WCAU reported.  They grabbed a pole, pulled the string and started filming. An aluminum crutch with a knife duct-taped to it fell to where a person’s head would be, the video shows. 'It's like 'Home Alone,' Delco style, Philly style,' Usayler told WCAU. 'It could've done a lot of damage, but luckily, we saw it before anybody got hurt.”
  • A Florida jail inmate helped save an infant Thursday who was accidentally locked in an SUV.  >> Read more trending news  Pasco Sheriff’s Office deputies were told the baby was in the locked vehicle in the parking lot of the courthouse, WFLA reported. Parents tried for several minutes to open the locked SUV and told responding deputies they could not afford a locksmith, WFLA reported.  The father told deputies he would break the front window, WFLA reported. However, an inmate crew from the jail was working nearby and offered to help. “There’s only a very small percentage of those criminals out there that want to fight us and want to attack us, but a lot of them, like these individuals, they know they made bad mistakes, bad choices but they want to do the right thing in life,' Pasco County Sheriff Chris Nocco told WFTS. The father pulled on the door while an inmate used a coat hanger to push the button for the electric door lock. Within a couple of minutes the vehicle was open. The child, Dallas, was fine and her parents were grateful for the help, WFTS reported.  The mother, identified as Shadow Lantry, said her child was locked in the SUV for about five minutes. “Thank God for the criminals in the world. I respect all of y’all,” Lantry said in a video.