ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
70°
Broken Clouds
H 85° L 62°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    70°
    Current Conditions
    Broken Clouds. H 85° L 62°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    80°
    Afternoon
    Partly Cloudy. H 85° L 62°
  • cloudy-day Created with Sketch.
    79°
    Evening
    Partly Cloudy. H 85° L 62°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Atlanta, GA Entertainment

Just Released and Coming Soon

Nearby Theaters Change Location

News

  • Heavy rain is likely to blame for part of building collapsing onto a downtown Atlanta sidewalk. It wasn't raining at the time Friday, but day after day of rain must have weakened the moulding at the top of the 2-story building on Pyror Street. The collapsed happened around 8 a.m. Friday when part of the building's decorative façade came crashing down. In exclusive video to Channel 2 Action News, a car driving down the street had to swerve to get out of the way of any falling debris. Two cars parked in the street were hit and had minor damage. Construction workers across the street said there was a man walking close by that was given a scare, but thankfully no one was injured. Channel 2 Action News spoke to the owner whose family's law firm operates out of the building. 'We are calling structural engineers, calling emergency crews to come clean up the mess, and then hopefully the city of Atlanta will allow us to open the front of the building to our clients can get inside,' said building owner Karen King. A structural engineer come out later and deemed the building sound.
  • Britain's fire-safety crisis expanded substantially Saturday as authorities said 34 high-rise apartment blocks across the country had cladding that failed fire safety tests. London officials scrambled to evacuate four public housing towers after experts found them 'not safe for people to sleep in overnight.' Hundreds of residents hastily packed their bags and sought emergency shelter, with many angry and confused about the chaotic situation. Some refused to leave their high-rise apartments. Scores of evacuees slept on inflatable beds in a gym while officials sought better accommodations for them. Camden Council leader Georgia Gould said it decided to evacuate four blocks in north London's Chalcots Estate late Friday after fire inspectors uncovered problems with 'gas insulation and door stops,' which, combined with the presence of flammable cladding encasing the buildings, meant residents had to leave immediately. The evacuation comes amid widening worries about the safety of high-rise apartment blocks across the country following the inferno that engulfed Grenfell Tower in west London on June 14, killing at least 79 people. Attention has focused on the 24-story tower's external cladding material, which has been blamed for the rapid spread of that blaze, but multiple other fire risks have now been identified in some housing blocks. The government said Saturday that the cladding samples that failed fire safety tests came from 34 apartment towers in cities including London, Manchester, Plymouth and Portsmouth. Communities Secretary Sajid Javid said further testing 'is running around the clock.' So far, Camden Council has been the only local authority to have asked residents to leave as a precaution. It said about 650 apartments were evacuated, though initial reports put the figure at 800 apartments. The council said residents would be out of their homes for three to four weeks while it completes fire-safety upgrades. 'I know some residents are angry and upset, but I want to be very clear that Camden Council acted to protect them,' Gould said in a statement. 'Grenfell changed everything, and when told our blocks were unsafe to remain in, we acted.' Conservative Prime Minister Theresa May, who has been criticized for her slow response to the Grenfell tragedy, said Saturday that the government was supporting Camden officials to ensure residents have somewhere to stay while building work is done. In response, Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the opposition Labour Party, said May needed to 'get a grip' and lead a stronger response to what is now a 'national threat.' Residents — including families with babies and elderly relatives — trooped out of the buildings late Friday night with suitcases and plastic bags stuffed with clothes. Council workers guided dozens to a nearby gym, where they spent the night on inflatable mattresses. Others were being put up in hotels or other housing projects. Many residents complained about a lack of information and confusion. Officials first announced the evacuation of one building, then expanded it to five before reducing it to four. Some residents said they learned about the evacuation from the television news hours before officials came knocking on doors. Renee Williams, 90, who has lived in Taplow Tower since 1968, told Britain's Press Association: 'No official came and told us what's going on. I saw it on the TV, so I packed an overnight bag. 'It's unbelievable. I understand that it's for our safety but they can't just ask us to evacuate with such short notice. There's no organization and it's chaos,' she said. Carl McDowell, 31, said he took one look at the inflatable beds at the gym and went back to his Taplow apartment to sleep there overnight. Other residents were distraught that they were ordered to evacuate, but were told to leave their pets behind in buildings that could be dangerous. Fire-safety experts say the Grenfell Tower blaze, which police said was touched off by a fire at a refrigerator, was probably due to a string of failures, not just the cladding, which is widely used to provide insulation and enhance the appearance of buildings. Police said Friday they are considering filing manslaughter charges in the Grenfell disaster and they were conducting a wide-ranging investigation that will look at everything that contributed to it. The Metropolitan Police said cladding attached to Grenfell during a recent renovation failed safety tests conducted by investigators. 'We are looking at every criminal offense from manslaughter onwards,' Detective Superintendent Fiona McCormack told reporters. 'We are looking at all health and safety and fire safety offenses, and we are reviewing every company at the moment involved in the building and refurbishment of Grenfell Tower.' The government has ordered an immediate examination of the refrigerator model that started the blaze, the Hotpoint model FF175BP refrigerator-freezer. The government also urged building owners, public and private, to submit samples of their cladding. One hotel chain, Premier Inn, has calling in experts to check its buildings. Police say 79 people are either confirmed or presumed dead in the Grenfell blaze, although that number may change, and it will take weeks to find and identify remains. To encourage cooperation with authorities, May said the government won't penalize any Grenfell fire survivors who were in the country illegally. ___ Sheila Norman-Culp, Gregory Katz and Alastair J. Grant contributed to this report.
  • A Midwest City, Oklahoma, doctor is facing murder charges in connection with the opioid-related deaths of five patients. >> Watch the news report here According to The Associated Press and Washington Post, police arrested Dr. Regan Nichols on Friday and charged her with five counts of second-degree murder. One of the patients, Sheila Bartels, reportedly died after overdosing on painkillers in 2012. The Post reported that on the day Bartels was discovered dead, she had filled a prescription for 510 pills. The AP also reported that Nichols “prescribed more than 3 million doses of controlled dangerous drugs from 2010-2014' and in 2010 “prescribed one 47-year-old patient a total of 450 pills.” >> Read more trending news “Nichols prescribed patients, who entrusted their well-being to her, a horrifyingly excessive amount of opioid medications,” Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter said, according to the AP, adding that her 'blatant disregard for the lives of her patients is unconscionable.” Nichols was released from prison on $50,000 bail.
  • All imports of fresh beef from Brazil have been halted because of recurring concerns about the safety of the products intended for the American market, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue said Thursday. The suspension of shipments will remain in place until the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture takes corrective action which the USDA finds satisfactory. The action comes three months after a major scandal erupted in Brazil over allegedly corrupt inspectors at slaughter and processing facilities. Brazilian officials said then that meat companies paid inspectors to overlook violations and certify tainted or rotten meat or not make inspections at all. >> Read more trending news However, before the crackdown, rotten meat was distributed in Brazil and exported to Europe. Since March, USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service has been inspecting 100 percent of all meat products arriving in the United States from Brazil. FSIS has refused entry to 11 percent of Brazilian fresh beef products. That figure is substantially higher than the rejection rate of one percent of shipments from the rest of the world. Since the implementation of the increased inspection, FSIS has refused entry to 106 lots (approximately 1.9 million pounds) of Brazilian beef products due to public health concerns, sanitary conditions, and animal health issues. It is important to note that none of the rejected lots made it into the U.S. market. The Brazilian government had pledged to address those concerns, including by self-suspending five facilities from shipping beef to the United States. Today’s action to suspend all fresh beef shipments from Brazil supersedes the self-suspension. Secretary Perdue issued the following statement: “Ensuring the safety of our nation’s food supply is one of our critical missions, and it’s one we undertake with great seriousness. Although international trade is an important part of what we do at USDA, and Brazil has long been one of our partners, my first priority is to protect American consumers. That’s what we’ve done by halting the import of Brazilian fresh beef. I commend the work of USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service for painstakingly safeguarding the food we serve our families.” >> Read the full news release here The U.S. is not a major importer of beef from Brazil because the U.S. produces more beef and veal than Brazil does. This year, U.S. beef and veal production are expected to grow 5 percent to more than 12 million tons, reaching a nine-year high, according to USDA reports. In 2016, the U.S. exported $6.3 billion in beef and beef products globally. The major importers of beef to the U.S. are Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Mexico, with Brazil ranking fifth. In May, Brazil re-opened its doors to U.S. fresh beef exports after a 13-year hiatus, the USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service reported. In 2003, Brazil closed its market fresh beef imports from the U.S. over concerns about bone spongiform encephalopathy, also known as mad cow disease. The Washington, D.C.-based National Farmers Union applauded the decision to suspend the importation of Brazilian beef and said it has long had concerns about the importation of fresh beef from Brazil. “Since the 2015 repeal of Country-of-Origin Labeling (COOL), food safety scandals can undermine consumer confidence in the entire beef industry, harming American producers’ bottom line. This incident underscores the importance of COOL to protect American beef producers and consumers alike,” NFU officials said in a statement. Monday, several cattle-ranching groups sued the USDA in Spokane, asking that it overturn its decision to not require country-of-origin labeling on meat imports. Without the labeling, imported meat can be sold as a U.S. product.
  • Political scientists say a major reason for the lack of choices is the way districts are drawn — gerrymandered, in some cases, to ensure as many comfortable seats as possible for the majority party by creating other districts overwhelmingly packed with voters for the minority party. 'With an increasing number of districts being drawn to deliberately favor one party over another — and with fewer voters indicating an interest in crossover voting — lots of potential candidates will look at those previous results and come to a conclusion that it's too difficult to mount an election campaign in a district where their party is the minority,' said John McGlennon, a longtime professor of government and public policy at the College of William & Mary in Virginia who has tracked partisan competition in elections. While the rate of uncontested races dipped slightly from 2014 to 2016, the percentage of people living in legislative districts without electoral choices has been generally rising over the past several decades. About 4,700 state House and Assembly seats were up for election last year. Of those, 998 Democrats and 963 Republicans won without any opposition from the other major political party. In districts dominated by one party, election battles are fought mostly in the primaries; the winner from the majority party becomes a virtual shoo-in to win the general election. Some states had a particularly high rate of uncompetitive races: —In Georgia, just 31 of the 180 state House districts featured both Republican and Democratic candidates, a nation-high uncontested rate of 83 percent. Republicans hold almost two-thirds of the seats in the Georgia House of Representatives. —In Massachusetts, just 34 of the 160 state House districts had candidates from both major parties, an uncontested rate of 79 percent. There, Democrats hold four-fifths of the House seats. —About 75 percent of the state House races in Arkansas and South Carolina lacked either a Democratic or Republican candidate. Under an Arkansas law passed this year, the names of unopposed candidates won't even have to be listed on future ballots. Unchallenged candidates will automatically be declared the winners. Voting for unopposed candidates 'just seems like an extra step in the process that we could eliminate,' said the sponsor of the Arkansas law, Rep. Charlotte Douglas, who hasn't faced any opposition the past two elections. She added: 'You hate to say that it doesn't count, because any vote counts, but it's unnecessary.' There are far fewer uncontested U.S. House races. Less than 15 percent of the 435 districts lacked a Republican or Democratic candidate last year. But some of the same states were atop that noncompetitive list: Five of Massachusetts' nine U.S. House districts lacked Republican candidates. Three of Arkansas' four districts lacked Democratic opponents. And in Georgia, which has 14 U.S. House districts, four Republicans and one Democrat ran unopposed by the other major party. There are reasons for unopposed elections aside from gerrymandering. Some states, particularly in the South, have political cultures that place less importance on partisan competition. Incumbency also poses a deterrent to potential challengers. University of Georgia political science professor Charles Bullock said the large number of uncompetitive districts in his home state may be due less to gerrymandering than to naturally segregated demographics, with Democratic-inclined black residents living in different areas than Republican-leaning white voters. Yet Georgia's Republican-led Legislature has continued to tinker with the district lines they drew after the 2010 Census in what some Democrats contend is an attempt to lessen competition. A 2015 law, which was recently challenged in court , altered the boundaries of 17 Georgia House districts, including two narrowly won by Republicans the previous year. This year, Georgia Republicans again sought to change the boundaries of several state House districts, including a couple won by Republicans by single-digit margins last November. Some of the proposed shifts sought to move heavily black precincts — where voters overwhelmingly support Democrats — from Republican-held districts into ones occupied by Democrats. Although the bill passed the House, it died in the Senate. Republican House Speaker David Ralston has said lawmakers were merely 'trying to put communities of interest together.' Democratic House Whip Carolyn Hugley criticized it as gerrymandering intended to create safer Republican seats. 'Every time our candidates get close to winning in these areas, then they come in to readjust them. It's the same as moving the goal post further and further back,' Hugley said. Several Democratic Georgia lawmakers teamed up with Republican state Sen. Josh McKoon this year to propose a constitutional amendment creating a bipartisan citizens' redistricting commission. But the measure never made it beyond a House or Senate committee. McKoon said Georgia's current redistricting process 'is horribly broken' and believes a commission could draw more logical boundaries. 'When you're drawing the districts with an eye to representing communities of interest rather than partisan strength, you're going to have more competitive districts,' he said. ___ Follow David A. Lieb at: http://twitter.com/DavidALieb
  • Chinese crews recovered nine bodies and were still searching for 109 others on Sunday, a day after a massive landslide buried a picturesque mountain village in the southwestern province of Sichuan. More than 2,500 rescuers with detection devices and dogs were looking for signs of life amid the rubble of massive boulders that descended on Xinmo village in Mao county early Saturday. The government lowered an earlier figure of 15 dead retrieved, which was initially reported in the state media. Three people — a couple and their month-old infant — are the only ones rescued from the site Saturday. A government-run news outlet said the adults were in stable conditions, while the baby was sent to an intensive care unit with pneumonia induced by mud inhalation. Relatives from nearby villages were sobbing as they awaited news of their loved ones. A woman told The Associated Press that she had no information on her family members in Xinmo. She said she had only heard reports that body parts were found. The landslide that struck early morning carried an estimated 8 million cubic meters (282 million cubic feet) of earth and rock, equivalent to more than 3,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools, when it slid down from steep mountains. It buried 1.6 kilometers (1 mile) of road and blocked a 2-kilometer (1.2-mile) section of a river as it completely wiped away the village that was once home to 46 families, or more than 100 people. Sitting on the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau and part of the Aba prefecture, Xinmo village has in recent years become a tourism destination for its picturesque scenery of homes in lush meadows nestled between steep and rugged mountains. Images posted by local authorities in social media now show a vast area of rubble with hardly any trace of a home. There were 142 tourists around the time the landslide hit, and all were alive, said Xu Zhiwen, executive deputy governor of the Aba prefecture. Three members of the Qiao family were found five hours after the landslide. Qiao Dashuai, 26, told the state broadcaster CCTV that he and his wife awoke to cries from their 1-month-old son around 5:30 a.m. 'Just after we changed the diaper for the baby, we heard a big bang outside and the light went out,' the husband said. 'We felt that something bad was happening and immediately rushed to the door, but the door was blocked by mud and rocks.' Qiao told CCTV his family was swept away by water as part of a mountain collapsed. He said they struggled against the flood until they met medical workers who took them to a hospital. His parents and other relatives were among the missing. Experts on state media say the landslide was likely triggered by rain. The mountainous region has been prone to geological disasters. In May 2008, a magnitude 7.9 earthquake killed nearly 90,000 people in Wenchuan county, some 40 kilometers (25 miles) away from Mao county. Scientist He Siming told the state-owned Beijing News that the 2008 earthquake could have done structural damage to the mountains surrounding Xinmo. He said the rain could have been the trigger. In 2014, a landslide in the same county killed 11 when it struck a section of a highway.