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Steve Miller Band with Peter Frampton

Sunday

Jul 16, 2017 – 7:00 PM

2200 Encore Parkway
Alpharetta, GA 30009 Map

  • Steve Miller Band
  • Peter Frampton

More Info

Steve Miller Band: Its hard to believe that 45 years have passed since The Steve Miller Band was conceived in San Francisco. During those 45 years, the band has become the archetype for classic rock. Hits like "The Joker," and "Fly Like An Eagle," have kept the band in heavy rotation on classic rock radio for decades now. Steve Miller tour dates are scheduled throughout the 2011 concert season.

After debuting their bluesy sound in Chicago during the late sixties, the band was quickly signed to Capitol Records. They recorded their debut the following year, "Children of the Future," which was released to mediocre sales in 1967. They had more luck with their sophomore album, "Sailor," which reached #24 on the Billboard 200 albums chart and marked the end of Boz Scaggs' contributions to Steve Miller records. The band continued to release material to moderate commercial success that played well to their hard rock oriented audience.

The Steve Miller band reached mainstream success with their 1973 release, "The Joker," which spawned the #1 hit single of the same name. The album marked the band's entrance into a more melodic-blues oriented sound with Steve Miller becoming the self-appointed "Space Cowboy." The rhythms kept on rollin', and in 1976 the band released their most commercially successful studio album to date. The band's ninth album, "Fly Like an Eagle," served up the hit singles, "Rock'n Me," and "Take the Money and Run." The band released subsequent albums including "Book of Dreams," and 1982's "Abracadra," whose title track gave Steve Miller his last #1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100. Subsequently, the band has focused more on touring than on recording new material. The Steve Miller Band concert schedule during the 1980s and 1990s consisted mostly of national headlining tours that attracted hoards of younger fans just discovering his music.

The band's greatest commercial success is their Greatest Hits (1974-1978) album which has been awarded diamond status and achieved sales of more than thirteen million albums! "Greatest Hits" ranks as one of the top fifty best selling albums of all time and solidified their status as classic rock icons. With over four decades of recording and touring, the Steve Miller Band concert dates have plenty of material to go on.

More recently, the band has recorded, "Bingo!," which is a cover album of R&B classics released in 2010. The album marks the band's first album of new material in seventeen years! Steve Miller has managed to keep himself busy in the meantime with a hectic touring schedule and a stint as Artist in Residence at the USC Thornton School of Music where he teaches music. For their contribution to the recording industry, the Steve Miller Band also has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame! Don't miss out on these living legends when they come to your area. Use Eventful for Steve Miller Band tour dates and concert schedule news.

Peter Frampton: With a career spanning forty years and including sold-out tour dates and over a dozen hit albums, Peter Frampton has earned a place as a rock icon. After rising to fame with the groups The Herd and Humble Pie, Frampton became infamous through acclaimed tour dates and his masterful use of the talk box. Arguably his most successful and groundbreaking album was 1976's Frampton Comes Alive!, which is celebrating a 35th anniversary this year. In honor of the album's lasting legacy, Peter Frampton has a number of tour dates in 2011 where he'll play the album in its entirety to the delight of huge audiences.

Peter Frampton's interest in music began at a young age, becoming the lead singer and guitarist for The Herd at the age of 16. The popularity made Frampton a teen idol, but he left the group two years later and formed Humble Pie with Small Faces alum Steve Marriott. Frampton recorded five albums and performed numerous tour dates with Humble Pie before leaving to pursue a solo career in 1971. His first few solo albums were well received, scoring a hit with "Do You Feel Like We Do." It was Frampton in 1975 that brought the artist solo success with "Show Me the Way" and "Baby, I Love Your Way", as well as showcasing his expert guitar work. It wasn't until these hit singles were featured on the double live album, Frampton Comes Alive!, that Peter Frampton was launched into superstardom

Frampton has continued to release great albums, but recognizes his fans' love for Frampton Comes Alive!. Peter Frampton's kindness towards his fans has led to live performances of the album on 2011 tour dates, which began on July 1. The tour will visit the US, Canada, UK, and a few European nations before concluding on November 23. Don't miss this opportunity to hear Frampton Comes Alive on these 35th anniversary tour dates in 2011.

News

  • Latest updates, results, photo galleries and stories from the 2018 Winter Olympic Games.
  • When asked about the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland in which 17 people were killed, former Miami Heat star LeBron James had one question: >> Read more trending news “How is it possible that we can have minors go buy a gun?” Nikolas Cruz, accused of the killings, is actually 19 and legally bought the AR-15 semiautomatic weapon that was used during the Feb. 14 incident. Still, James, the Cavaliers’ superstar, and other players with ties to South Florida could not make sense of the tragedy. The players were asked about the shooting during Saturday’s media day for the NBA All-Star Weekend. “We have a kid who wasn’t legally unable (sic) to buy a beer at a bar, but he can go buy an AR-15?” James said “It doesn’t make sense. I’m not saying it should be legal for him to go buy beer. But how is it possible that we can have minors go buy a gun?” Heat guard Wayne Ellington, who was fourth in Saturday’s 3-point contest, said the nation has to “come together” to makes changes so these mass shootings do not continue to occur. The shooting was the ninth deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, five of those coming in the last six years. WATCH: Florida school shooting survivor slams politicians, NRA in emotional speech “I was at a loss for words,” Ellington said. “I couldn’t understand what’s going on, why (this) is going on in the world. Do we need to change? These young people doing unexplainable things, hurting each other and hurting innocent people it’s so unfortunate and sad, it’s something I don’t know how we can change but it’s something we need to come together and figure out.” John Collins, the Atlanta Hawks rookie from Palm Beach County, was calling home to try to understand what was happening. “It was a real shock to me,” said Collins, who played in Friday’s Rising Stars Challenge. “Obviously, I never expected something like that to happen. I know a couple of people that were affected by that tragedy. You got to say your prayers and sending your condolences and thoughts to the victims.” What are the worst school shootings in modern US history? James, though, was the most outspoken in calling for gun control. “We’ve seen these schools and these tragedies happen in America and there’s been no change to gun control,” James said. “I don’t have the answer to this. But we have to do something about it. We’re all sending our kids to school, right? We drop them off at 8 o’clock. At 3:15 they’re going to be ready to get picked up. Either we’re picking them or someone in our family is picking them up or they have to take a bus or there’s aftercare and they stay until 5. If they have study hall they stay until 5:30 or whatever. But we all feel like our kids are going to return, right? “To the families in Parkland, down in Broward County, it’s sad and I’m sorry and it’s just a tragedy and I hope we don’t continue to see this because it’s too many in the last 10 years with guns.” James, meanwhile, has been embroiled in a social media debate with Fox News commentator Laura Ingraham, who said that athletes like James should 'keep the political commentary to yourself.” “Or as someone once said, 'Shut up and dribble,’” Ingraham said. Ingraham was referencing an interview that James and Kevin Durant taped in January with ESPN’s Cari Champion for a show called “Uninterrupted.” The two NBA stars spoke about the political climate in the United States and had harsh criticism for President Donald Trump, ESPN reported. Durant, in an interview with USA Today on Friday, said Ingraham's comments were 'racist.'  “That was definitely an ignorant comment (by Ingraham). I do play basketball, but I am a civilian and I am a citizen of the United States, so my voice is just as loud as hers, I think -- or even louder.” James, on his Instagram account, posted a photo of a neon sign that read “I am more than an athlete.” Ingraham released a statement Saturday defending her comments, ESPN reported. 'In 2003, I wrote a New York Times bestseller called 'Shut Up & Sing,' in which I criticized celebrities like the Dixie Chicks and Barbra Streisand, who were trashing then-President George W. Bush. I have used a variation of that title for more than 15 years to respond to performers who sound off on politics,” Ingraham wrote. “If pro athletes and entertainers want to freelance as political pundits, then they should not be surprised when they're called out for insulting politicians. There was no racial intent in my remarks -- false, defamatory charges of racism are a transparent attempt to immunize entertainment and sports elites from scrutiny and criticism.
  • Fires in Paulding County that destroyed five homes and damaged nine others overnight started as the result of arson, officials said The Safety Fire Commissioner’s Office said a person is in custody in connection with the arson that started at a home on Rosemont Court in Hiram, spokesman Glenn Allen said. “The identity of that person will be released when they are formally charged with arson,” Allen said.  Paulding County Fire spokesman Lt. Steve Mapes said at least three families were displaced from the area of Rosemont Court in the Greystone Subdivision. “Representatives from the Red Cross established a disaster operation at the neighborhood community center,” Mapes said.  No injuries were reported.
  • The sound of gunfire still ringing in his ears after his mad half-mile sprint, Jack Ciaramello was standing with friends in a grocery store parking lot when a sheriff's deputy approached. He asked the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High senior if he knew a former student named Nikolas Cruz. Of course he did: Cruz had been one of Ciaramello's cadets in the school's tight-knit Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps. Ciaramello's head reeled. He'd escaped, but his 14-year-old brother — also a cadet — was still in the school. Why was the deputy asking about Cruz? 'And then it clicked,' the 17-year-old senior said. Officials have accused Cruz in the Wednesday shooting rampage that left 17 students and staff dead. In the days since, reports of Cruz's violent, threatening behavior have flooded traditional and social media. Some students said they weren't surprised, but Ciaramello was. He knew Cruz was troubled and had a thing about guns. But he'd never suspected Cruz was capable of this kind of savagery. As Cruz's leader in Company E — 'Echo Company' — Ciaramello tried to instill discipline, pride and a sense of camaraderie in Cruz. The 350 or so cadets at Douglas are issued uniforms and T-shirts — with the motto 'WHATEVER IT TAKES' over the heart — and they're required to show the colors as much as possible, or risk demerits. But last year, Cruz stopped wearing his JROTC gear. As leader, Ciaramello took notice. He said Cruz always had an excuse for being out of uniform. Worried Cruz would get kicked out of the corps, Ciaramello asked what it would take to get him to wear his gear. His request: a Snickers candy bar. 'So I went out to the store, I bought him it, and the next day, there on after, he came in with the uniform every day — T-shirt, uniform, everything,' Ciaramello said. Ciaramello found Cruz a bit odd but didn't consider his cadet dangerous. 'He liked hunting. He liked fishing. And me, being a guy and liking that kind of thing, you know, military, ROTC ... it seemed normal,' he said. 'Obviously, it wasn't.' When the fire alarms rang out for the second time Wednesday, Ciaramello was on the drill field behind the school when he heard the unmistakable sound of gunfire. Teachers screamed at him and other kids to get back inside to the classrooms. 'Nope,' he said to himself. 'I don't want to be stuck in a classroom if there's an armed shooter on the campus.' As he hopped the fence and began sprinting down the road, he thought about his younger brother, James — a sergeant, the highest rank he could attain as a freshman. Ciaramello fought the urge to go back and find him. 'Even if I wanted to, I couldn't do anything. So I knew I had to run.' The family had previously lived in Newtown, Connecticut — they left about three months before a former student shot and killed 26 students and teachers there. This time, the boys were both there, in Parkland, for the rampage. James Ciaramello was in geography class when the alarm sounded. Then came the pops. Having fired both an AR-15 rifle and 9 mm pistol, he knew the sound. The teacher rushed the kids back into the classroom. After 40 agonizing minutes huddled against a wall, there came a pounding on the door. 'We didn't know if it was just a ploy to get us out of the rooms, so we could be shot,' he said. 'But my teacher went over and checked and, thankfully, it was the police, and they opened the door.' He made it out of the building - but not all his JROTC comrades did. Cadet Carlos Gutierrez, 14, was in a study hall when police came to rescue them. On his way out of the building, he saw several bodies — including one with the blue pants and distinctive shiny shoes of a JROTC member protruding from a covering. They'd soon learn that of the 14 students killed, three — Peter Wang, Martin Duque and Alaina Petty — were JROTC members. Witnesses told Wang's family that the 15-year-old was last seen in his uniform, holding open a door for others to escape. And when Cruz was arrested, he, too, wore ROTC gear: a maroon polo shirt emblazoned with the corps' crest. ___ Follow the AP's complete coverage of the Florida school shooting here: https://apnews.com/tag/Floridaschoolshooting.
  • Selling raffle tickets to benefit an athletic team is not new, but having an AR-15 semiautomatic weapon as the prize is drawing heavy criticism in the wake of the shooting at a Florida high school that killed 17 and injured dozens, The Kansas City Star reported. >> Read more trending news Third-graders in the southern Missouri city of Neosho were selling the tickets to benefit their traveling baseball team. Levi Patterson, the coach of a 9-and-under team in Neosho, said the idea was conceived before the Feb. 14 shooting at Parkland High School in South Florida, the Star reported. The father of one of the players offered the weapon for the raffle.  Patterson told the Star that he considered changing the prize after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, but decided to “turn it into a positive thing.” The post, which has since been removed by Facebook, showed a weapon next to the mascot logo of South Elementary School in Neosho.  The raffle is not affiliated with the Neosho School District, and the winner must pass a background check before receiving the gun, the Star reported. “Are you all tone deaf?” Dan Weaver wrote in a Facebook post on Patterson’s page. “AR15 kills seventeen so you raffle a gun for child sports? Lord, people wake the hell up. Justify all you want but you are wrong, period.” Patterson answered the post, noting that “gun raffles have been going on for years. Evil has and will always exist. Our hearts break for those involved, and we do not take that lightly.” The Star originally linked to the exchange, but the link is no longer active. Patterson told the Star that he understands the criticism, which has been fierce. >> Florida school shooting: How difficult is it to purchase a gun in Florida? “I applaud them for standing up for what they believe in. I just think they have feelings to this specific type of gun (that are) different than people around here do,” he said. Tyler Tannahill of Kansas, who is running for Congress, was criticize this week for offering an AR-15 giveaway as part of his campaign, the Star reported. Patterson stressed that the baseball players, who range in age from 7 to 9, are under no obligation to sell the raffle tickets. “We appreciate your ‘concern’ but please understand, we are not, have not, and will not force one of our boys to sell raffle tickets for the Black Rain AR15 Spec 15, if they are uncomfortable doing so,” he wrote on Facebook.