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  • Police released a sketch of a man accused of shooting a Georgia Tech student as he and his brother were driving away from an accident scene earlier this month. Claude Rooney, who also goes by Tre, told Channel 2 Action News he still has a bullet lodged in his arm from the April 13 incident.  It began when Christian Rooney picked up his brother from a BP gas station near Georgia Tech at about 9:50 p.m. Christian Rooney’s girlfriend, Dallas Reeves-Hill, was also in the car, so he decided to let his brother drive, according to an Atlanta police incident report. Tre Rooney made a right turn out of the gas station on Spring Street and headed toward I-75 North, Christian Rooney told police. Then, Tre Rooney started merging into a right lane. That’s when “a white Honda Civic came up beside them at a high rate of speed and the vehicles collided,” police said in the report. After the brothers got out of the car, the other driver assessed his car and started to get angry, Christian Rooney told police. But the other driver wasn’t yelling or making threats, Christian Rooney said. He noticed the man had a gun, so the brothers decided to get back in their car and leave, according to the police report. Christian Rooney said that’s when the other driver shot between four and six times as they were on the I-75 North on-ramp, according to the incident report. Soon after, Tre Rooney realized he had been hit.  'He was shooting to kill,' Tre Rooney told Channel 2. After the brothers stopped to have a flat tire repaired, Tre Rooney was treated at Grady Memorial Hospital with an injury to his right arm and leg. Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 404-577-8477.
  • The brutal murder of a young pregnant woman is shocking enough, but the news hit a local homeless shelter especially hard. That's because the people there had tried to save her from a life on the streets. DeKalb police say Ashley Mays died in a DeKalb hotel last November after advertising on Backpage.com. 'We try so hard with these kids and we try to help them,' Covenant House Georgia's Executive Director Allison Ashe told Channel 2 investigative reporter Mark Winne about the news of May's murder. 'I mean, it broke my heart.' The murder has deeply affected the staff and youth at the homeless shelter, where Mays twice checked herself in for help. Ashe described her as, 'a beautiful young woman full of light and love. She was incredibly outgoing, incredibly charismatic.' But the young mother, pregnant with child number two, struggling to make a way, and was lured back to the street. An indictment charges Terique Hall with Mays' murder and more. 'It broke my heart.' A courthouse contact says Mays had fallen into prostitution. It's still under investigation whether Hall contacted her through her Backpage.com ad to buy sex in order to attack Mays, but we're told allegations surfaced in court that Hall also arranged to buy sex from two other women he attacked in DeKalb. Those women survived. Hall's lawyer says Hall plead not guilty to all counts. RELATED STORIES: No escort section? No problem for prostitutes on Backpage.com Backpage raided, CEO arrested on sex-trafficking charges 15 arrested in Johns Creek prostitution bust 23 men arrested in underage sex sting 'Operation Spring Cleaning' DeKalb police vice commander Curtis Williams says the victimization he sees, in a variety of ways of young people and the community, is a big part of why his investigators do what Winne watched them do in three days of undercover operations. 'I did something wrong. I was nervous about it because I've never done it,' a man who answered a Backpage.com classified told Winne after he was caught in an undercover sting. Winne asked another man, 'Did you think you were hiring a prostitute?' 'No,' the man said. Eight men were caught up in the police sting. They were all professionals, including an accountant, an insurance agent and a retired fire marshall. Police arrested eight women as well. The story of Ashley Mays' murder is a sad punctuation to a new report by Covenant House Georgia and Loyola University New Orleans. A summary indicates that of 64 youth interviewed in Atlanta, 14 percent had been trafficked for sex and 38 percent of LGBTQ youth interviewed were trafficked for sex. 'I'm a person, a human who has feelings and not just a sex object.' Winne talked with Covenant House resident Je'Brial Lee. 'When you were 14 and 15, you were performing sexual acts for money with these older men?' Winne asked. 'Yes,' Lee replied. 'On a fairly frequent basis?' 'Yes.' Lee told Winne counseling helps work through what happened. 'I'm a person, a human who has feelings and not just a sex object,' Lee said. Another young woman told Winne she never saw any money for the countless sex acts her so-called boyfriend from high school arranged. She can't even say for sure if she got paid. 'There was multiple times when police could have caught me,' she told Winne. Covenant House Georgia's executive director sums it up this way: 'We can't let this happen to another person like Ashley.' Winne was on the board of Covenant House when Ashley Mays was there. Shortly after her murder, her family told Channel 2's Nefertiti Jaquez, 'I am saddened by her tragic death, but our faith will always be in the Lord.
  • The Latest on North Korea test-firing a missile (all times local): 8:38 a.m. Sunday President Donald Trump says he believes China's president has been putting pressure on North Korea as it pursues its missile and nuclear weapons programs. In an interview with CBS' 'Face the Nation,' Trump says he won't be happy if North Korea conducts a nuclear test and that he believes Chinese President Xi Jinping won't be happy, either. Asked if that means military action, Trump responded: 'I don't know. I mean, we'll see.' The interview is set to air later Sunday in the U.S. ___ 5:35 a.m. Sunday Pope Francis is warning that 'a good part of humanity' will be destroyed if tensions with North Korea escalate, and he is calling for diplomacy and a revived United Nations to take the lead in negotiating a resolution. Francis was asked as he traveled back to Rome from Egypt on Saturday local time (Sunday morning Seoul time) about North Korean ballistic missile tests and U.S. warnings of 'catastrophic' consequences if the world fails to stop them. He was asked specifically what he would tell U.S. President Donald Trump, who has sent a U.S. carrier to conduct drills near the Koreas, and other leaders to try to diffuse the tensions. Francis says he would urge them to use diplomacy and negotiation 'because it's the future of humanity.' 'Today, a wider war will destroy not a small part of humanity, but a good part of humanity and culture. Everything. Everything, no? It would be terrible. I don't think humanity today could bear it,' he told reporters. ___ 6:45 p.m. Saturday South Korea's navy says it has started joint exercises with U.S. ships, including the supercarrier USS Carl Vinson, which the United States dispatched to the region in a show of force amid the growing threat posed by North Korea's nuclear and missile programs. The drills began Saturday hours after South Korean and U.S. officials said they detected what they presumed was a failed missile launch from an area near the North Korean capital, Pyongyang. The South Korean navy says the drill is aimed at 'deterring North Korea's provocations and displaying the firm alliance between the United States and South Korea.' The USS Carl Vinson also participated in annual springtime drills between United States and South Korea in March. ___ 5:35 p.m. Norwegian Foreign Minister Borge Brende said Saturday on Twitter that 'new missile test violates SC (Security Council) resolution. Urgent need for common action to reduce tension.' Norway, which is not a current member of the Security Council, is a founding member of the United Nations and has always considered the body as a cornerstone in its foreign policy. ___ 1:05 p.m. One of Tokyo's major subways systems says it shut down all lines for 10 minutes early Saturday after receiving warning of a North Korean missile launch. Tokyo Metro official Hiroshi Takizawa says the temporary suspension affected 13,000 passengers. Service was halted on all nine lines at 6:07 a.m. It resumed at 6:17 a.m. after it was clear there was no threat to Japan. Takizawa says it was the first time service had been stopped in response to a missile launch. Train service is generally suspended in Japan immediately after large earthquakes. Tokyo Metro decided earlier this month to stop for missile launch warnings as well. ___ 11:35 a.m. North Korea's state media has reiterated the country's goal of developing a nuclear missile capable of reaching the continental United States on the same day rivals Washington and Seoul detected a failed missile launch from an area near Pyongyang. The Rodong Sinmun newspaper also said Saturday that the North revealed two types of new intercontinental ballistic missiles in an April 15 military parade honoring its late state founder, Kim Il Sung, the grandfather of current ruler Kim Jong Un. The parade featured previously unseen large rocket canisters and launcher trucks. It said: 'The large territory that is the United States has been entirely exposed to our pre-emptive nuclear strike means.' Referring to the United States sending the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier to Korean waters, the newspaper said that 'rendering aircraft carriers useless is not even a problem' for its military. The newspaper says that the North displayed three types of ICBMs during the parade, including two new types that were inside the canisters. Analysts say the North's existing liquid-fuel ICBMS, including the KN-08 and KN-14, are potentially capable of reaching the U.S. mainland, although the North has never flight tested them. ___ 10 a.m. Japan's government spokesman says the missile launched by North Korea is believed to have traveled about 50 kilometers (30 miles) and fallen on an inland part of the country. Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga (yoh-shee-hee-deh soo-gah) said the ballistic missile was fired to the northeast around 5:30 a.m. from an area in the vicinity of Pukchang, north of Pyongyang, the capital. He spoke at a news conference following a meeting of Japan's National Security Council. ___ 9:45 a.m. France's U.N. ambassador says the U.N. Security Council is 'mobilized' and unanimous on the need to denuclearize North Korea. Francois Delattre said at the United Nations after North Korea's apparently failed missile launch Saturday that while there were 'nuances' on policy to be worked out among council members, there is unanimity on the need for North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons. North Korea fired the missile hours after the Security Council held a ministerial meeting on Pyongyang's escalating weapons program. North Korean officials boycotted the meeting, which was chaired by U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. Delattre says the council must be 'very firm' implementing sanctions, adopting new ones if necessary and denouncing North Korea's human rights record. ___ 8:50 a.m. South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff says a North Korean missile flew for several minutes and reached a maximum height of 71 kilometers (44 miles) before it apparently failed Saturday. The joint chiefs said in a statement on Saturday that the missile was fired 49 degrees northeast from an area near Pukchang, just north of the capital Pyongyang. It didn't immediately provide an estimate on how far the missile flew. South Korea says it's still analyzing what type of missile the North fired. A U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive matters, said the missile was likely a medium-range KN-17 ballistic missile and that it broke up a couple of minutes after launch. ___ 8:38 a.m. President Donald Trump says North Korea 'disrespected' China with its most recent ballistic missile test. South Korea's military said in a statement Friday afternoon that North Korea had fired the missile from an area near the capital of Pyongyang, but provided no other details. U.S. and South Korean officials say the launch apparently failed. Trump did not answer reporters' questions about the missile launch upon returning to the White House from a daytrip to Atlanta. But he commented on Twitter, saying, 'North Korea disrespected the wishes of China & its highly respected President when it launched, though unsuccessfully, a missile today. Bad!' ___ 8:30 a.m. Japan has protested the latest missile launch by North Korea. Japanese government spokesman Yoshihide Suga (yoh-shee-hee-deh soo-gah) said Saturday that a ballistic missile firing would be 'a clear violation of U.N. security council resolutions.' He added that Japan 'cannot accept repeated provocation by North Korea' and had 'lodged a strong protest against North Korea.' Japan has become increasingly concerned in recent weeks about the possibility of a North Korean missile attack targeting Japan or U.S. forces stationed in Japan. ___ 8:15 a.m. Japan's public broadcaster NHK has aired footage of a U.S. aircraft carrier sailing off the coast of Nagasaki prefecture in southern Japan. The USS Carl Vinson is heading north toward the Korean peninsula in a show of force after satellite images suggested North Korea may be preparing to conduct a nuclear test. NHK said it shot the footage Saturday morning from a helicopter. Nagasaki is in Kyushu, the southernmost of Japan's four main islands. The Vinson conducted joint training Friday with two Japanese destroyers and two Japanese F-15 fighter jets in waters further south off the Japanese island of Okinawa. ___ 7:35 a.m. The White House says President Donald Trump has been briefed on North Korea's most recent ballistic missile test. South Korea's military said in a statement Friday afternoon that North Korea had fired the missile from an area around the capital of Pyongyang, but provided no other details. U.S. and South Korean officials say the launch apparently failed. Trump returned to the White House from a trip to Atlanta shortly after the news broke. He did not answer reporters' questions about the missile launch. Trump has threatened military action if North Korea continues its pursuit of a nuclear weapons program. He has also said he would prefer to resolve the issue through diplomacy. __ 7:12 a.m. A U.S. official says North Korea has tested what was likely a medium-range ballistic missile. The official says the missile broke up a couple minutes after the launch and the pieces fell into the Sea of Japan. The official was citing an American assessment and says it appeared to be a medium-range KN-17 ballistic missile. The official wasn't authorized to speak publicly on the matter and demanded anonymity. —Lolita C. Baldor in Washington ___ 6:23 a.m. South Korea's foreign minister is warning that if the international community doesn't respond to North Korea's repeated provocations now, 'we will only further feed the appetite of the trigger-happy regime in Pyongyang.' Yun Byung-se told a ministerial meeting of the U.N. Security Council on Friday that it should take additional punitive measures before North Korea launches more ballistic missiles or conducts a new nuclear test — not afterward. He proposed 'potent measures' including halting the export and supply of crude oil to North Korea, completely cutting off its hard currency earnings by suspending all coal imports from the country, downgrading diplomatic relations, 'and seriously considering whether North Korea, a serial offender, is qualified as a member of the U.N.' Yun said South Korea's goal 'is not to bring North Korea to its knees but to bring it back to the negotiating table for genuine
  • ___ BIRDS IN BEANTOWN The Orioles face Boston at Fenway Park in their first meeting since tempers flared a week ago at Camden Yards. Manny Machado rankled the Red Sox with a late slide into second baseman Dustin Pedroia, then two days Matt Barnes buzzed the Baltimore star with a fastball behind the head. The dustup drew a lot of heat, and Barnes was suspended four games. LONE STAR LOSSES Houston missed the playoffs last season, and the Rangers really hurt them. The Astros were just 4-15 against their intrastate rivals, and are only 10-28 since Jeff Banister became the Texas manager in 2015. They meet for the first time this year, with Houston-area native Andrew Cashner starting for the Rangers and Lance McCullers pitching for the Astros at Minute Maid Park. NOT A PERFECT 10 The Royals try to avoid a 10th straight loss when they host the White Sox. Kansas City is stuck in its worst skid since dropping 12 in a row in April 2012. Jason Vargas starts for the Royals after losing to Chicago last week. TEST TIME Mets ace Noah Syndergaard is having an MRI, a day after he left a shaky start with a possible lat strain. He refused to have an MRI on his biceps Friday, but will now get checked after giving up five runs in the first inning of a 23-5 loss at Washington. Syndergaard was pulled with one out in the second after his 38th pitch. Mets general manager Sandy Alderson said this problem 'may or may not be related to his previous complaint, which was in the bicep, so we'll just have to wait and see what happens.' DOING OK? The Brewers might have a better feel for how slugger Ryan Braun is feeling. He left Sunday's game because of arm soreness and tightness in his right trapezius, a large muscle that extends from the shoulder into the upper back. Braun, hitting .287 with seven home runs, said he doesn't expect to go on the disabled list. The former NL MVP has missed time with lower back tightness this season and last year. FIRE UP THE COALS Pirates righty RHP Gerrit Cole (1-3, 3.60 ERA) is scheduled to make his 100th career start when Cincinnati visits PNC Park. He is 0-6 in eight starts against the Reds.
  • Many questions still remain after two women, one a popular local model, were found dead in a Buckhead apartment.It's still very hard for Chucky Kahng to comprehend why his friend -- Summer Moss -- had to die. 'When you hear about someone like that passing it really does come as a shock,' Kahng told Channel 2's Nefertiti Jaquez.Police found Moss and her friend, Katherine Green, dead in a Buckhead apartment complex Thursday night.'It makes it harder to believe that they're not here anymore,' Kahng said. Kahng, a professional photographer, met Moss 10 years ago while covering an event. Since then, the two had been very close friends.While he wasn't 'as close to' Green - he says he knew her well enough to know both victims were battling drug addiction. TRENDING STORIES: Tornado Watch issued for western Georgia until 8 p.m. Georgia man wins $5 million while running errands for wife Family, friends gather to say goodbye to brothers killed in crash 'A tragedy like this was bound to happen. It wasn't a surprise in that regard,' Kahng told Jaquez. Atlanta police would not comment on the open investigation. But sources working the case told Jaquez the bodies of the women were found by a friend around 9 p.m. on April 27.Moss was found in the bathroom and Green was in a bedroom covered with a blanket.Sources told Jaquez that officers also found clear bags containing white power, pills and marijuana in the apartment.That news was hard for Kahng to process.'She was fragile, so kind, she was like an angel. That's the one word people use to describe her - and we didn't expect her to become an angel so soon,' Kahng said.Friends and family have set up a YouCaring page to help with funeral expenses for Moss.
  • A line of storms moved through north Georgia Sunday evening ahead of front that is anticipated to bring stronger storms across the metro early Monday morning. 'This round of wet weather will be impacting most of us on our Monday morning commute,' Walls said. TORNADO WATCH CANCELED FOR ALL COUNTIES IN VIEWING AREA. More storms to move in overnight/AM, non-severe. pic.twitter.com/cxtQaGpCqi-- Katie Walls (@KatieWallsWSB) April 30, 2017 [Download the free Severe Weather Team 2 app for alerts in your area] The line will move into to northwest Georgia around 5 a.m. Monday and will continue to move east across Rome, Carrollton and start entering into the metro by 7 a.m. We're tracking the next round of storms, on the Channel 2 Action News Nightbeat at 11 p.m. 'This line could become a bit quicker,' Walls said. 'We're going to be dealing with headaches on the highway because of the current situation. You combine that with some gusty winds, lightning, as well as some heavy rain, all a possibility on your Monday morning commute. Download the FREE Severe Weather Team 2 Weather App By around 1 p.m. most of those storms will have moved out of the metro with a clearing sky behind the front. A high wind advisory is also in place from 8 p.m. Sunday until 4 p.m. Monday for the north Georgia mountains. It mainly affects locations about 2,000 feet, where people could see downed limbs and trees from gusts that could reach more than 40 mph. Things will dry out for a couple of days, but there is another round of potentially severe storms heading our way Thursday into Friday. Stay with Severe Weather Team 2 as we track the storm's progress throughout the week on Channel 2 Action News. Non-severe storms, gusty wind in Chattooga, Floyd county are moving eastward and continue to weaken. pic.twitter.com/xmbJATYhdH-- Katie Walls (@KatieWallsWSB) April 30, 2017 While strong, storms entering NW GA are not actively severe. This is NOT the round to impact the AM. pic.twitter.com/x4EDZ8gwIV-- Katie Walls (@KatieWallsWSB) April 30, 2017